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Distributed work and travel behaviour: The dynamics of interactive agency choices between employers and employees

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  • Ann Brewer

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  • David Hensher

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Abstract

This paper develops a framework within which multiple agents make discrete choices in respect of a common objective – the determination of participation in distributed work, especially the opportunities and constraints associated with telecommuting. Ideas in discrete choice theory and game theory are combined to define a set of choice experiments in which employees and employers interact in arriving at a choice path in a distributed work context. A state choice experiment with offers and feedback, known as an interactive agency choice experiment (IACE), is empirically investigated in the context of telecommuting options with an exploratory sample of employees and employers in Sydney, Australia. The approach highlights the role of information and negotiation in breaking down the barriers to more flexible work activity, to deliver potential benefits to the transport system such as reduced traffic congestion and environmental sustainability. The paper identifies the types of incentives that an employee/er has to offer the employer/employee in securing effective telecommuting. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Suggested Citation

  • Ann Brewer & David Hensher, 2000. "Distributed work and travel behaviour: The dynamics of interactive agency choices between employers and employees," Transportation, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 117-148, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:transp:v:27:y:2000:i:1:p:117-148
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1005248429131
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1023/A:1005248429131
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 1991. "Telecommuting and Travel: State of the Practice, State of the Art," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4zc486ph, University of California Transportation Center.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hensher, David A. & Bliemer, Michiel C.J., 2014. "What type of road pricing scheme might appeal to politicians? Viewpoints on the challenge in gaining the citizen and public servant vote by staging reform," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 227-237.
    2. de Jong, Gerard, 2012. "Application of experimental economics in transport and logistics," European Transport \ Trasporti Europei, ISTIEE, Institute for the Study of Transport within the European Economic Integration, issue 50, pages 1-3.
    3. Pawlak, Jacek & Polak, John W. & Sivakumar, Aruna, 2015. "Towards a microeconomic framework for modelling the joint choice of activity–travel behaviour and ICT use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 92-112.
    4. Bartels, R & Fiebig, D.G & McCabe, A, 2004. "The value of using stated preference methods: a case study in modelling water heater choices," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 487-495.
    5. Hensher, David A. & Puckett, Sean M. & Rose, John M., 2007. "Agency decision making in freight distribution chains: Establishing a parsimonious empirical framework from alternative behavioural structures," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 41(9), pages 924-949, November.
    6. de Graaff, Thomas & Rietveld, Piet, 2007. "Substitution between working at home and out-of-home: The role of ICT and commuting costs," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 142-160, February.
    7. Zhang, Junyi & Kuwano, Masashi & Lee, Backjin & Fujiwara, Akimasa, 2009. "Modeling household discrete choice behavior incorporating heterogeneous group decision-making mechanisms," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 230-250, February.
    8. Bliemer, Michiel C.J. & Rose, John M., 2011. "Experimental design influences on stated choice outputs: An empirical study in air travel choice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 63-79, January.
    9. David Hensher & Sean Puckett & John Rose, 2007. "Extending stated choice analysis to recognise agent-specific attribute endogeneity in bilateral group negotiation and choice: a think piece," Transportation, Springer, vol. 34(6), pages 667-679, November.
    10. Puckett, Sean M. & Rose, John M. & Bain, Stuart, 2012. "Modelling heterogeneity in scale directly: implications for estimates of influence in freight decision-making groups," European Transport \ Trasporti Europei, ISTIEE, Institute for the Study of Transport within the European Economic Integration, issue 50, pages 1-2.
    11. Sean Puckett & David Hensher & John Rose & Andrew Collins, 2007. "Design and development of a stated choice experiment for interdependent agents: accounting for interactions between buyers and sellers of urban freight services," Transportation, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 429-451, July.
    12. Marcucci, Edoardo & Rotaris, Lucia & Paglione, Guido, 2009. "A methodology to evaluate the prospects for the introduction of a Park&Buy service," European Transport \ Trasporti Europei, ISTIEE, Institute for the Study of Transport within the European Economic Integration, issue 42, pages 26-46.
    13. David Hensher & Matthew Beck & John Rose, 2011. "Accounting for Preference and Scale Heterogeneity in Establishing Whether it Matters Who is Interviewed to Reveal Household Automobile Purchase Preferences," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 49(1), pages 1-22, May.

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