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Application of experimental economics in transport and logistics

  • de Jong, Gerard
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    There is scope for applying experimental economics in transport and logistics analysis. Experimental economics is a set of techniques for gathering (and analysing) data by inducing people (through specific rewards) to act as economic agents and observing the choices they then make in experimental situations. These experiments often involve interactions between the respondents, possibly in a market setting, and this can be applied in transport to study for instance shipper – carrier interaction. Various subfields of experimental economics that might be relevant for transport and logistics research are described. We also review past applications of experimental economics in transport and logistics and work out some ideas for future applications.

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    File URL: http://www.openstarts.units.it/dspace/bitstream/10077/6111/1/B_DE_JONG%20-%20ET2012.50.03.pdf
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    Article provided by ISTIEE, Institute for the Study of Transport within the European Economic Integration in its journal European Transport / Trasporti Europei.

    Volume (Year): (2012)
    Issue (Month): 50 ()
    Pages: 3

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    Handle: RePEc:sot:journl:y:2012:i:50:n:3
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    1. Alessandro Innocenti & Patrizia Lattarulo & Maria Grazia Pazienza, 2009. "Heuristics and Biases in Travel Mode Choice," Labsi Experimental Economics Laboratory University of Siena 027, University of Siena.
    2. Ledyard, John O. & Olson, Mark & Porter, David & Swanson, Joseph A. & Torma, David P., 2000. "The First Use of a Combined Value Auction for Transportation Services," Working Papers 1093, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
    3. Ann Brewer & David Hensher, 2000. "Distributed work and travel behaviour: The dynamics of interactive agency choices between employers and employees," Transportation, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 117-148, February.
    4. Anders Lunander & Jan-Eric Nilsson, 2004. "Taking the Lab to the Field: Experimental Tests of Alternative Mechanisms to Procure Multiple Contracts," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 39-58, January.
    5. Kene Boun My & Laurent Denant-Boèmont & Frédéric Koessler & Marc Willinger & Anthony Ziegelmeyer, 2006. "Road Traffic Congestion and Public Information: An Experimental Investigation," Papers on Strategic Interaction 2006-20, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group.
    6. repec:dgr:kubcen:199793 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Selten, R. & Chmura, T. & Pitz, T. & Kube, S. & Schreckenberg, M., 2007. "Commuters route choice behaviour," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 394-406, February.
    8. Carlsson, Fredrik & Martinsson, Peter, 1999. "Do Hypothetical and Actual Willingness to Pay Differ in Choice Experiments? - Application to the Valuation of the Environment," Working Papers in Economics 13, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    9. Gunnar Isacsson & Jan-Eric Nilsson, 2003. "An Experimental Comparison of Track Allocation Mechanisms in the Railway Industry," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, London School of Economics and University of Bath, vol. 37(3), pages 353-381, September.
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