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Combining Stated And Revealed Preference Data To Construct An Empirical Examination Of Intrahousehold Bargaining

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  • Dosman, Donna
  • Adamowicz, Wiktor L.

Abstract

The behavior of households has traditionally been explained by assuming that a single decision maker maximizes utility over all members of the household subject to a budget constraint. This unitary model of household behavior has been questioned and compared to models that assume that household decisions are made in a bargaining process. We examine household behavior in a bargaining framework by combining stated preference information from individual members of the household with revealed preference information on the household's actual choices. The context of the decision is determining the location of family recreation vacation choice. The resulting model, based on a bargaining framework, provides information on the factors affecting bargaining power as well as information on the degree to which the decision is the result of a bargaining process.

Suggested Citation

  • Dosman, Donna & Adamowicz, Wiktor L., 2002. "Combining Stated And Revealed Preference Data To Construct An Empirical Examination Of Intrahousehold Bargaining," Staff Paper Series 24084, University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ualbsp:24084
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Marieka Klawitter, 2008. "The effects of sexual orientation and marital status on how couples hold their money," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(4), pages 423-446, December.
    2. Morey, Edward & Thiene, Mara, 2012. "A parsimonious, stacked latent-class methodology for predicting behavioral heterogeneity in terms of life-constraint heterogeneity," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 130-144.
    3. Ho, Chinh Q. & Mulley, Corinne & Shiftan, Yoram & Hensher, David A., 2016. "Vehicle value of travel time savings: Evidence from a group-based modelling approach," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 134-150.
    4. Semra Ozdemir, 2015. "Improving the Validity of Stated-Preference Data in Health Research: The Potential of the Time-to-Think Approach," The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, Springer;Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, vol. 8(3), pages 247-255, June.
    5. Dupont, Diane P., 2004. "Do children matter? An examination of gender differences in environmental valuation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 273-286, July.
    6. Wiktor L. Adamowicz & Klaus Glenk & Jürgen Meyerhoff, 2014. "Choice modelling research in environmental and resource economics," Chapters,in: Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 27, pages 661-674 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Maligalig, Rio L. & Demont, Matty & Umberger, Wendy J. & Peralta, Alexandra, 2017. "Intrahousehold decision making on rice varietal trait improvements: Using experiments to estimate gender influence," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258522, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Rungie, Cam & Scarpa, Riccardo & Thiene, Mara, 2014. "The influence of individuals in forming collective household preferences for water quality," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 161-174.
    9. Carlsson, Fredrik & He, Haoran & Martinsson, Peter & Qin, Ping & Sutter, Matthias, 2012. "Household decision making in rural China: Using experiments to estimate the influences of spouses," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 525-536.
    10. repec:kap:enreec:v:68:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10640-016-0060-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. David Hensher & Sean Puckett & John Rose, 2007. "Extending stated choice analysis to recognise agent-specific attribute endogeneity in bilateral group negotiation and choice: a think piece," Transportation, Springer, vol. 34(6), pages 667-679, November.
    12. Martina Menon & Federico Perali & Marcella Veronesi, 2014. "Recovering Individual Preferences for Non-Market Goods: A Collective Travel-Cost Model," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 96(2), pages 438-457.
    13. Pushkar Maitra & Ranjan Ray, 2006. "Household expenditure patterns and resource pooling: evidence of changes in post-apartheid South Africa," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 325-347, December.
    14. Marcucci, Edoardo & Rotaris, Lucia & Paglione, Guido, 2009. "A methodology to evaluate the prospects for the introduction of a Park&Buy service," European Transport \ Trasporti Europei, ISTIEE, Institute for the Study of Transport within the European Economic Integration, issue 42, pages 26-46.
    15. Beck, Matthew J. & Hess, Stephane, 2016. "Willingness to accept longer commutes for better salaries: Understanding the differences within and between couples," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 1-16.
    16. Patil, Sunil & Burris, Mark & Douglass Shaw, W., 2011. "Travel using managed lanes: An application of a stated choice model for Houston, Texas," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 595-603, August.
    17. repec:eee:regeco:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:23-35 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Yang, Xiaojun & Carlsson, Fredrik, 2012. "Intra-household decisions making on intertemporal choices: An experimental study in rural China," Working Papers in Economics 537, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    19. Vikki O’Neill & Stephane Hess, 2014. "Heterogeneity assumptions in the specification of bargaining models: a study of household level trade-offs between commuting time and salary," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(4), pages 745-763, July.
    20. David Hensher & Matthew Beck & John Rose, 2011. "Accounting for Preference and Scale Heterogeneity in Establishing Whether it Matters Who is Interviewed to Reveal Household Automobile Purchase Preferences," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 49(1), pages 1-22, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics;

    JEL classification:

    • Q21 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q26 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Recreational Aspects of Natural Resources

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