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Changes in Job Stability – Evidence from Lifetime Job Histories

Author

Listed:
  • Miikka Rokkanen

    () (MIT)

  • Roope Uusitalo

    () (HECER, University of Helsinki)

Abstract

We use individual-level panel data spanning over 42 years from the pension records to evaluate changes in job stability in Finland between 1963 and 2004. Compared with previous research on job stability we cover much longer period and for some cohorts observe the entire lifetime job histories. These data allow us to study job stability using standard duration models instead of simply examining changes in elapsed tenure. We find that hazard of job loss increased during the recession years in the early 1990s but has then returned to the level that prevailed in the 1970s. We also demonstrate that fluctuations in the hazard rate together with changes in labor market entry rates have complicated dynamic effects on the tenure distribution, and that analysing changes in job stability based on the elapsed duration of ongoing jobs may be quite misleading.

Suggested Citation

  • Miikka Rokkanen & Roope Uusitalo, 2013. "Changes in Job Stability – Evidence from Lifetime Job Histories," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 36-55, Autumn.
  • Handle: RePEc:fep:journl:v:26:y:2013:i:2:p:36-55
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ossi Korkeamäki & Tomi Kyyrä, 2012. "Institutional rules, labour demand and retirement through disability programme participation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 439-468, January.
    2. Eerola, Essi & Lyytikäinen, Teemu, 2015. "On the role of public price information in housing markets," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 74-84.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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