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Has Job Stability Decreased in Norway?




A widespread belief in the popular press is that job stability has declined across Western economies over the last 15 years. However, little support for this is found in the empirical literature. We use an extensive employer–employee data set for Norway to analyse changes in job stability in Norway by first presenting descriptive measures of job stability for manufacturing, the public sector and private services. Both descriptive analyses of tenure, hire and separation rates as well as regression-adjusted measures controlling for changes in demographics and the business cycle, indicate a slight decrease in job stability in Norway driven by increased job separation rates. These changes are not equally distributed across sectors or sub-groups of workers. However, we do not find that this tendency towards less stable jobs led to an increase in job-to-unemployment/out of the labour force; rather it was characterized by more job-to-job changes.

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  • Bratberg, Espen & Salvanes, Kjell Gunnar & Vaage, Kjell, 2006. "Has Job Stability Decreased in Norway?," Working Papers in Economics 11/06, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:bergec:2006_011

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Miikka Rokkanen & Roope Uusitalo, 2013. "Changes in Job Stability – Evidence from Lifetime Job Histories," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 36-55, Autumn.

    More about this item


    Job stability; employer-employee data.;

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs


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