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Job Tenure in Britain 1975-92


  • Burgess, Simon
  • Rees, Hedley


The authors examine eighteen years of a large cross-section to build up a picture of job tenure in Britain. They look for changes in the distribution of job tenure over a turbulent period for the U.K. labor market. The authors find some change in the mean job tenure: a decrease in elapsed tenure of about 10 percent between 1975 and 1992. These are important changes but they do not support the view that the dramatic changes in the labor market, technology, and competition have spelled the end of 'jobs for life.' Copyright 1996 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Burgess, Simon & Rees, Hedley, 1996. "Job Tenure in Britain 1975-92," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(435), pages 334-344, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:106:y:1996:i:435:p:334-44

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Brown, William & Walsh, Janet, 1991. "Pay Determination in Britain in the 1980s; the Anatomy of Decentralization," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(1), pages 44-59, Spring.
    2. Clark, Simon, 1991. "Inventory Accumulation, Wages, and Employment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(405), pages 230-238, March.
    3. Nickell, Stephen J, 1987. "Why Is Wage Inflation in Britain So High?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 49(1), pages 103-128, February.
    4. Ingram, Peter N, 1991. "Ten Years of Manufacturing Wage Settlements: 1979-89," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(1), pages 93-106, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Miikka Rokkanen & Roope Uusitalo, 2013. "Changes in Job Stability – Evidence from Lifetime Job Histories," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 36-55, Autumn.
    2. Jaime Saavedra-Chanduví & Máximo Torero, 2000. "Labor Market Reforms and Their Impact on Formal Labor Demand and Job Market Turnover: The Case of Peru," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 3269, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Knuth, Matthias & Mühge, Gernot & Müller, Angelika, 1999. "The toll of change: Economic restructuring, worker displacement, and unemployment in West Germany," Graue Reihe des Instituts Arbeit und Technik 1999-07, Institut Arbeit und Technik (IAT), Westfälische Hochschule, University of Applied Sciences.
    4. Vegard Skirbekk, 2004. "Age and Individual Productivity: A Literature Survey," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 2(1), pages 133-154.
    5. Espen Bratberg & Kjell G. Salvanes & Kjell Vaage, 2010. "Has Job Stability Decreased? Population Data from a Small Open Economy," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 112(1), pages 163-183, March.

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