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What if people value nature? Climate change and welfare costs

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  • Arbex, Marcelo
  • Batu, Michael

Abstract

We introduce temperature shocks and preferences for environmental quality in a real business cycle model with natural resources. Temperature anomalies are transmitted to the business cycles via their negative effects on output and agents’ utility. Our findings suggest that permanent and temporary weather shocks propagation and their welfare implications depend crucially on whether agents value environmental quality. A permanent increase in temperature reduces output with damages reaching up to 1.61% of GDP. Agents who value environmental quality experience a higher temporary welfare gain when facing a negative weather shock, but welfare drops faster as the economy returns to equilibrium. Temperature anomalies amplify the (negative) effect of climate change on natural resources use and welfare.

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  • Arbex, Marcelo & Batu, Michael, 2020. "What if people value nature? Climate change and welfare costs," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:resene:v:61:y:2020:i:c:s0928765519301642
    DOI: 10.1016/j.reseneeco.2020.101176
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Business cycles; Temperature shocks; Climate change; Environmental quality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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