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How to measure innovation? New evidence of the technology-growth linkage

  • Jalles, João Tovar

It is an undoubtful fact that economic growth depends, ultima ratio, on the production of new ideas. This article aims to contribute to the long-standing debate on the choice of the best proxy to measure innovation and technological diffusion, by offering alternative variables which are tested empirically by means of a panel dataset of 73 countries between 1980 and 2005. Two different proxies of technological progress (patents and a Intellectual Property Rights Index) are used to explain different growth rates of income per capita and, after controlling for endogeneity, our results suggest that both have a positive effect on innovation (and economic growth).

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research in Economics.

Volume (Year): 64 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 81-96

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Handle: RePEc:eee:reecon:v:64:y:2010:i:2:p:81-96
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  1. Hellwig, Martin & Irmen, Andreas, 2001. "Endogenous Technical Change in a Competitive Economy," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 101(1), pages 1-39, November.
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