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Worker mobility, employer-provided general training, and the choice of graduate education

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  • Gicheva, Dora

Abstract

This paper links inherent mobility to observed schooling choices. A job search model with graduate education predicts that more mobile workers are more likely to enroll in full-time MBA programs. Adding to the literature on employer-sponsored general training, the model predicts that employers are likely to provide tuition assistance to workers who find quits costly. I use a panel survey of GMAT registrants to test some of the empirical implications of the model. I show that observable measures of job attachment are correlated with the probability of attending part-time and, conditional on part-time attendance, with the likelihood of receiving tuition reimbursement.

Suggested Citation

  • Gicheva, Dora, 2012. "Worker mobility, employer-provided general training, and the choice of graduate education," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 232-240.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:19:y:2012:i:2:p:232-240
    DOI: 10.1016/j.labeco.2011.11.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Joseph G. Altonji & Peter Arcidiacono & Arnaud Maurel, 2015. "The Analysis of Field Choice in College and Graduate School: Determinants and Wage Effects," NBER Working Papers 21655, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job mobility; Employer-provided general training; MBA education;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training

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