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Why do employers pay for college?

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  • Cappelli, Peter

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  • Cappelli, Peter, 2004. "Why do employers pay for college?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 213-241.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:121:y:2004:i:1-2:p:213-241
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eme:rlepps:v:18:y:1999:i:1999:p:303-330 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1979. "Job Matching and the Theory of Turnover," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 972-990, October.
    3. Hersch, Joni & Reagan, Patricia, 1990. "Job Match, Tenure and Wages Paid by Firms," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 28(3), pages 488-507, July.
    4. David H. Autor, 2001. "Why Do Temporary Help Firms Provide Free General Skills Training?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1409-1448.
    5. Jaeger, David A. & Stevens, Ann Huff, 1999. "Is Job Stability in the United States Falling?," IZA Discussion Papers 35, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Magee, L. & Robb, A. L. & Burbidge, J. B., 1998. "On the use of sampling weights when estimating regression models with survey data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 251-271, June.
    7. Stevens, Margaret, 1994. "An Investment Model for the Supply of Training by Employers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 556-570, May.
    8. John M. Barron & Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black, 1999. "Do Workers Pay for On-The-Job Training?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(2), pages 235-252.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marc Blatter & Samuel Muehlemann & Samuel Schenker & Stefan C. Wolter, 2016. "Hiring costs for skilled workers and the supply of firm-provided training," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(1), pages 238-257.
    2. Colleen Flaherty Manchester, 2008. "The Effect of Tuition Reimbursement on Turnover: A Case Study Analysis," NBER Chapters,in: The Analysis of Firms and Employees: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches, pages 197-228 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Colleen Flaherty, 2007. "The Effect of EmployerProvided General Training on Turnover: Examination of Tuition Reimbursement Programs," Discussion Papers 06-025, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    4. Rao, Neel, 2015. "General training in labor markets: Common value auctions with unobservable investment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 19-45.
    5. Sevilir, Merih, 2010. "Human capital investment, new firm creation and venture capital," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 483-508, October.
    6. Rinawi, Miriam & Backes-Gellner, Uschi, 2013. "Should I stay or should I go? - The Effect of Performance Pay on the Retention of Apprenticeship Graduates," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80024, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Colleen Flaherty Manchester, 2010. "Investment in General Human Capital and Turnover Intention," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 209-213, May.
    8. Mohrenweiser, Jens & Wydra-Sommaggio, Gaby & Zwick, Thomas, 2015. "Work-related ability as source of information advantages of training employers," ZEW Discussion Papers 15-057, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    9. Björn Frank, 2008. "Location decisions in a changing labour market environment," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 28(1), pages 31-42, February.
    10. Ravi Bapna & Nishtha Langer & Amit Mehra & Ram Gopal & Alok Gupta, 2013. "Human Capital Investments and Employee Performance: An Analysis of IT Services Industry," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 59(3), pages 641-658, November.
    11. Gicheva, Dora, 2012. "Worker mobility, employer-provided general training, and the choice of graduate education," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 232-240.
    12. Lerman, Robert I., 2013. "Skill Development in Middle Level Occupations: The Role of Apprenticeship Training," IZA Policy Papers 61, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Jens Mohrenweiser & Gabriele Wydra-Somaggio & Thomas Zwick, 2017. "Information Advantages of Training Employers Despite Credible Training Certificates," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0121, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Apr 2017.
    14. Muehlemann, Samuel & Pfeifer, Harald & Walden, Günter & Wenzelmann, Felix & Wolter, Stefan C., 2010. "The financing of apprenticeship training in the light of labor market regulations," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 799-809, October.
    15. Colleen N. Flaherty, 2007. "The Effect of Tuition Reimbursement on Turnover: A Case Study Analysis," NBER Working Papers 12975, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Nathan Berg & Todd Gabel, 2013. "Effects of New Welfare Reform Strategies on Welfare Participation: Microdata Estimates from Canada," Working Papers 1304, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2013.

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