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Does graded return-to-work improve sick-listed workers' chance of returning to regular working hours?

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  • Høgelund, Jan
  • Holm, Anders
  • McIntosh, James

Abstract

Using Danish register and survey data, we examine the effect of a national graded return-to-work program on the probability of sick-listed workers returning to regular working hours. During program participation, the sick-listed worker works fewer hours and receives the normal hourly wage for the hours worked and sickness benefit for the hours off work. When the worker's health improves, working hours are increased until the sick-listed worker is able to work regular hours. Taking account of unobserved differences between program participants and non-participants, we find that participation in the program significantly increases the probability of returning to regular working hours.

Suggested Citation

  • Høgelund, Jan & Holm, Anders & McIntosh, James, 2010. "Does graded return-to-work improve sick-listed workers' chance of returning to regular working hours?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 158-169, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:29:y:2010:i:1:p:158-169
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    6. Kai Rehwald & Michael Rosholm & Bénédicte Rouland, 2015. "Does Activating Sick-Listed Workers Work? Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," Working Papers hal-01228454, HAL.
    7. T. Everhardt & Ph. Jong, 2011. "Return to Work After Long Term Sickness," De Economist, Springer, vol. 159(3), pages 361-380, September.
    8. Schneider, Udo & Linder, Roland & Verheyen, Frank, 2016. "Long-term sick leave and graded return to work: What do we know about the follow-up effects?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 120(10), pages 1193-1201.
    9. Rainer Eppel & Thomas Leoni & Helmut Mahringer, 2016. "Österreich 2025 – Gesundheit und Beschäftigungsfähigkeit. Status quo, internationale Erfahrungen und Reformperspektiven," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 58794, February.
    10. Markussen, Simen & Mykletun, Arnstein & Røed, Knut, 2010. "The Case for Presenteeism," IZA Discussion Papers 5343, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Rehwald, Kai & Rosholm, Michael & Rouland, Bénédicte, 2018. "Labour market effects of activating sick-listed workers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 15-32.
    12. Richard V. Burkhauser & Mary C. Daly & Nicolas R. Ziebarth, 2016. "Protecting working-age people with disabilities: experiences of four industrialized nations [Absicherung von Personen mit Erwerbsminderung: Erfahrungen aus vier Industrieländern]," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 49(4), pages 367-386, December.
    13. Simen Markussen, 2012. "The individual cost of sick leave," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(4), pages 1287-1306, October.
    14. Markussen, Simen & Mykletun, Arnstein & Røed, Knut, 2012. "The case for presenteeism — Evidence from Norway's sickness insurance program," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(11), pages 959-972.
    15. Kools, Lieke & Koning, Pierre, 2019. "Graded return-to-work as a stepping stone to full work resumption," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 189-209.
    16. Johansson, Per & Lee, Myoung-jae, 2016. "On Nonparametric Identification of Treatment Effects in Duration Models," IZA Discussion Papers 10247, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. Pedersen, Morten Saaby & Arendt, Jacob Nielsen, 2014. "Bargaining for health: A case study of a collective agreement-based health program for manual workers," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 123-136.
    18. Andrén, Daniela, 2011. ""Half empty or half full": The importance of the definition of part-time sick leave when estimating its effects," Working Papers 2011:4, Örebro University, School of Business.
    19. Godøy, Anna, 2016. "Profiting from presenteeism? Effects of an enforced activation policy on firm profits," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 122-128.
    20. Thomas Leoni, 2015. "Wirkmodell Krankenstand," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 58579, December.
    21. Udo Schneider & Roland Linder & Frank Verheyen, 2016. "Long-term sick leave and the impact of a graded return-to-work program: evidence from Germany," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(5), pages 629-643, June.
    22. Knut Røed, 2012. "Active social insurance," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-22, December.

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