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The Effectiveness of Medical and Vocational Interventions for Reducing Sick Leave of Self-Employed Workers

Author

Listed:
  • Baert, Stijn

    () (Ghent University)

  • van der Klaauw, Bas

    () (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

  • van Lomwel, Gijsbert

    () (UWV Netherlands Social Security Institute)

Abstract

We investigate whether interventions by (i) medical doctors and (ii) occupational specialists are effective in reducing sick leave durations among self-employed workers. To this end, we exploit unique administrative data comprising all sick leave claims by self-employed workers insured with the major Dutch private insurer between January 2009 and March 2014. We estimate a multivariate duration model dealing with non-random selection into the two intervention types by controlling for observable and unobservable claimant characteristics. We find adverse treatment effects for both interventions, which are heterogeneous by the physical toughness of the claimants' occupation.

Suggested Citation

  • Baert, Stijn & van der Klaauw, Bas & van Lomwel, Gijsbert, 2016. "The Effectiveness of Medical and Vocational Interventions for Reducing Sick Leave of Self-Employed Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 9692, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9692
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    dynamic treatment effects; sickness absenteeism; self-employment; medical interventions;

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets

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