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Imperfect market, emissions trading scheme, and technology adoption: A case study of an energy-intensive sector

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  • Wang, Xu
  • Zhang, Xiao-Bing
  • Zhu, Lei

Abstract

It is widely accepted that the firms included in an emissions trading scheme (ETS) come mostly from oligopolistic industries. The “exclusionary manipulation” of these heterogeneous emitters can distort both output and permit markets and lead to differences in abatement technology adoption. We studied the impacts of asymmetric firms' market power on the diffusion of abatement technologies. A model for technology adoption among heterogeneous firms has been established, which takes into account diversity in production capacity and the integration of firms' strategic behaviour in both the carbon permit and the output markets. Our model reveals that, considering the direct and strategic effects in adoption benefits, firms' production capacity can directly determine their sequence order of adoption, and their market power can accelerate the diffusion of a new abatement technology. A case study of an energy-intensive sector in China is illustrated to support the conclusions derived from the model and help policymakers better understand the diffusion of abatement technologies under imperfect market structure.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Xu & Zhang, Xiao-Bing & Zhu, Lei, 2019. "Imperfect market, emissions trading scheme, and technology adoption: A case study of an energy-intensive sector," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 142-158.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:81:y:2019:i:c:p:142-158
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2019.03.014
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    3. Wang, Ge & Zhang, Qi & Su, Bin & Shen, Bo & Li, Yan & Li, Zhengjun, 2021. "Coordination of tradable carbon emission permits market and renewable electricity certificates market in China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C).
    4. Oluleye, Gbemi & Gandiglio, Marta & Santarelli, Massimo & Hawkes, Adam, 2021. "Pathways to commercialisation of biogas fuelled solid oxide fuel cells in European wastewater treatment plants," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 282(PA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Imperfect market; Emissions trading scheme; Technological diffusion; Production capacity; Strategic behaviour;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation
    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q55 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Technological Innovation

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