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Correcting for truncation bias caused by a latent truncation variable

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  • Bloom, David E.
  • Killingsworth, Mark R.

Abstract

We discuss estimation of the model Y[sub i] = X[sub i]b[sub y] + e[sub Yi] and T[sub i] =X[sub i]b[sub T] + e[sub Ti] when data on the continuous dependent variable Y and on the independent variables X are observed if the "truncation variable" T > 0 and when T is latent. This case is distinct from both (i) the "censored sample" case, in which Y data are available if T > 0, T is latent and X data are available for all observations, and (ii) the "observed truncation variable" case, in which both Y and X are observed if T > 0 and in which the actual value of T is observed whenever T > O. We derive a maximum-likelihood procedure for estimating this model and discuss identification and estimation.
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Suggested Citation

  • Bloom, David E. & Killingsworth, Mark R., 1985. "Correcting for truncation bias caused by a latent truncation variable," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 131-135, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:27:y:1985:i:1:p:131-135
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    1. Jerry A. Hausman & David A. Wise, 1976. "The Evaluation of Results from Truncated Samples: The New Jersey Income Maintenance Experiment," NBER Chapters,in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 5, number 4, pages 421-445 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", pages 129-137.
    3. Amemiya, Takeshi, 1973. "Regression Analysis when the Dependent Variable is Truncated Normal," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 41(6), pages 997-1016, November.
    4. Olsen, Randall J, 1982. "Distributional Tests for Selectivity Bias and a More Robust Likelihood Estimator," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 23(1), pages 223-240, February.
    5. Wales, T J & Woodland, A D, 1980. "Sample Selectivity and the Estimation of Labor Supply Functions," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 21(2), pages 437-468, June.
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    1. BAUWENS, Luc & GINSBURGH, Victor, 2000. "Art experts and auctions are pre-sale estimates unbiased and fully informative?," CORE Discussion Papers RP 1485, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    2. Adrian Pagan, 1986. "Two Stage and Related Estimators and Their Applications," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, pages 517-538.
    3. Daskalopoulou, Irene, 2008. "Fairness perceptions and observed consumer behavior: Results of a partial observability model," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 31-44, February.
    4. Julie L. Hotchkiss & David L. Sjoquist & Stephanie M. Zobay, 1999. "Employment Impact of Inner-city Development Projects: The Case of Underground Atlanta," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 36(7), pages 1079-1093, June.
    5. Jonathan Yoder, 2002. "Estimation of Wildlife-Inflicted Property Damage and Abatement Based on Compensation Program Claims Data," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(1), pages 45-59.
    6. Mata, Jose, 1996. "Markets, entrepreneurs and the size of new firms," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 89-94, July.
    7. Emran, M. Shahe & Shilpi, Forhad, 2017. "Estimating Intergenerational Mobility with Incomplete Data: Coresidency and Truncation Bias in Rank-Based Relative and Absolute Mobility Measures," MPRA Paper 80724, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Kostas Tsekouras & Dimitris Skuras & Irene Daskalopoulou, 2008. "The role of productive efficiency on entry and post-entry performance under different strategic orientation: the case of the Greek plastics and rubber industry," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(1), pages 37-55.
    9. Colombo, Massimo G. & Grilli, Luca, 2005. "Start-up size: The role of external financing," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 243-250, August.
    10. Kounetas, Kostas & Tsekouras, Kostas, 2008. "The energy efficiency paradox revisited through a partial observability approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2517-2536, September.
    11. Emran,M. Shahe & Greene,William & Shilpi,Forhad J., 2016. "When measure matters: coresidency, truncation bias, and intergenerational mobility in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7608, The World Bank.
    12. Colombo, Massimo G. & Delmastro, Marco & Grilli, Luca, 2004. "Entrepreneurs' human capital and the start-up size of new technology-based firms," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 22(8-9), pages 1183-1211, November.
    13. Alberto Palloni & Jason Thomas, 2013. "Estimation of Covariate Effects With Current Status Data and Differential Mortality," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(2), pages 521-544, April.

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