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Estimation of Covariate Effects With Current Status Data and Differential Mortality

  • Alberto Palloni

    ()

  • Jason Thomas

    ()

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    The assessment of the impact that socioeconomic determinants have on the prevalence of certain chronic conditions reported by respondents in population surveys must confront two problems. First, the self-reports could be in error (false positives and false negatives). Second, those reporting are a selected sample of those who ever experience the problem, and this selection is heavily influenced by excess mortality attributable to the condition being reported. In this article, we use a combination of empirical data and microsimulation to (a) assess the magnitude of the bias attributable to the selection problem, and (b) suggest an adjustment procedure that corrects for this bias. We find that the proposed adjustment procedure considerably reduces the bias arising from differential mortality. Copyright Population Association of America 2013

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s13524-012-0160-6
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Demography.

    Volume (Year): 50 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 521-544

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:50:y:2013:i:2:p:521-544
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/13524

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    1. Noreen Goldman, 1993. "Marriage selection and mortality patterns: Inferences and fallacies," Demography, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 189-208, May.
    2. Yuanreng Hu & Noreen Goldman, 1990. "Mortality Differentials by Marital Status: An International Comparison," Demography, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 233-250, May.
    3. Bloom, David E. & Killingsworth, Mark R., 1985. "Correcting for truncation bias caused by a latent truncation variable," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 131-135, January.
    4. Heckman, James & Singer, Burton, 1984. "A Method for Minimizing the Impact of Distributional Assumptions in Econometric Models for Duration Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(2), pages 271-320, March.
    5. James Vaupel & Kenneth Manton & Eric Stallard, 1979. "The impact of heterogeneity in individual frailty on the dynamics of mortality," Demography, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 439-454, August.
    6. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    7. Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 1995. "Selection corrections for panel data models under conditional mean independence assumptions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 115-132, July.
    8. Greene, William H, 1981. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error: Comment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(3), pages 795-98, May.
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