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Forecasting regional GDP with factor models: How useful are national and international data?

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  • Kopoin, Alexandre
  • Moran, Kevin
  • Paré, Jean-Pierre

Abstract

We assess the contribution of national (country-wide) and international data to the task of forecasting the real GDP of Canadian provinces. Using the targeting predictors approach of Bai and Ng (2008) [Bai, J., Ng, S., 2008. Forecasting economic time series using targeted predictors. Journal of Econometrics 146, 304–317], we find that larger datasets containing regional, national and international data help improve forecasting accuracy for horizons below the one-year-ahead mark, but that beyond that horizon, relying on provincial data alone produces the best forecasts. These results suggest that shocks originating at the national and international levels are transmitted to Canadian regions and reflected in regional timeseries fairly rapidly.

Suggested Citation

  • Kopoin, Alexandre & Moran, Kevin & Paré, Jean-Pierre, 2013. "Forecasting regional GDP with factor models: How useful are national and international data?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(2), pages 267-270.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:121:y:2013:i:2:p:267-270
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2013.08.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Andy C.C. Kwan & John A. Cotsomitis, 2006. "The Usefulness of Consumer Confidence in Forecasting Household Spending in Canada: A National and Regional Analysis," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 44(1), pages 185-197, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Robert Lehmann, 2016. "Economic Growth and Business Cycle Forecasting at the Regional Level," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 65, July.
    2. Robert Lehmann & Klaus Wohlrabe, 2014. "Forecasting gross value-added at the regional level: are sectoral disaggregated predictions superior to direct ones?," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 34(1), pages 61-90, February.
    3. Kopoin, Alexandre, 2015. "Cross-border Banking, Spillover Effects and International Business Cycles," MPRA Paper 65515, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 06 Apr 2015.
    4. repec:ura:ecregj:v:1:y:2017:i:2:p:410-421 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Robert Lehmann & Klaus Wohlrabe, 2014. "Regional economic forecasting: state-of-the-art methodology and future challenges," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 3(4), pages 218-231.
    6. Tony Chernis & Calista Cheung & Gabriella Velasco, 2017. "A Three-Frequency Dynamic Factor Model for Nowcasting Canadian Provincial GDP Growth," Discussion Papers 17-8, Bank of Canada.
    7. Robert Lehmann & Klaus Wohlrabe, 2015. "Forecasting GDP at the Regional Level with Many Predictors," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 16(2), pages 226-254, May.
    8. Federico Lampis, 2016. "Forecasting the sectoral GVA of a small Spanish region," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 5(2), pages 38-44.
    9. Kevin Moran & Simplice Aimé Nono & Imad Rherrad, 2018. "Forecasting with Many Predictors: How Useful are National and International Confidence Data?," Cahiers de recherche 1814, Centre de recherche sur les risques, les enjeux économiques, et les politiques publiques.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Dynamic factor models; Targeted predictors; Regional forecasts;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods

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