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For whom the Pell tolls: The response of university tuition to federal grants-in-aid


  • Singell, Larry Jr.
  • Stone, Joe A.


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  • Singell, Larry Jr. & Stone, Joe A., 2007. "For whom the Pell tolls: The response of university tuition to federal grants-in-aid," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 285-295, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:26:y:2007:i:3:p:285-295

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Coates, Dennis & Humphreys, Brad R, 2002. "The Supply of University Enrollments: University Administrators as Utility Maximizing Bureaucrats," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 110(3-4), pages 365-392, March.
    2. Hoenack, Stephen A. & Pierro, Daniel J., 1990. "An econometric model of a public university's income and enrollments," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 403-423, December.
    3. Siow, Aloysius, 1997. "Some evidence on the signalling role of research in academia," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 271-276, July.
    4. Connolly, Laura S., 1997. "Does external funding of academic research crowd out institutional support?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 389-406, June.
    5. Michael Rizzo & Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 2004. "Resident and Nonresident Tuition and Enrollment at Flagship State Universities," NBER Chapters,in: College Choices: The Economics of Where to Go, When to Go, and How to Pay For It, pages 303-354 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. McPherson, Michael S & Schapiro, Morton Owen, 1991. "Does Student Aid Affect College Enrollment? New Evidence on a Persistent Controversy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 309-318, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yuexing Lan & John V Winters, 2011. "Did the D.C. Tuition Assistance Grant Program Cause Out-of-State Tuition to Increase?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(3), pages 2444-2453.
    2. Stratton Leslie S. & Wetzel James N., 2013. "Are Students Dropping Out or Simply Dragging Out the College Experience? Persistence at the Six-Year Mark," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 1121-1142, October.
    3. Delaney, Jennifer A. & Kearney, Tyler D., 2015. "The impact of guaranteed tuition policies on postsecondary tuition levels: A difference-in-difference approach," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 80-99.
    4. Stephanie R. Cellini & Rajeev Darolia & Lesley J. Turner, 2016. "Where Do Students Go when For-Profit Colleges Lose Federal Aid?," NBER Working Papers 22967, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Webber, Douglas A., 2017. "Risk-sharing and student loan policy: Consequences for students and institutions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 1-9.
    6. Grey Gordon & Aaron Hedlund, 2017. "Accounting for the Rise in College Tuition," NBER Chapters,in: Education, Skills, and Technical Change: Implications for Future U.S. GDP Growth National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Stephanie Riegg Cellini & Claudia Goldin, 2014. "Does Federal Student Aid Raise Tuition? New Evidence on For-Profit Colleges," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 174-206, November.
    8. Frederick, Allison B. & Schmidt, Stephen J. & Davis, Lewis S., 2012. "Federal policies, state responses, and community college outcomes: Testing an augmented Bennett hypothesis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 908-917.
    9. Eric Bettinger & Betsy Williams, 2013. "Federal and State Financial Aid during the Great Recession," NBER Chapters,in: How the Financial Crisis and Great Recession Affected Higher Education, pages 235-262 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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