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Aging, transitional dynamics, and gains from trade

  • Naito, Takumi
  • Zhao, Laixun

We formulate a two-country, two-good, two-factor, two-period-lived overlapping generations model to examine how population aging determines the pattern of and gains from trade. Two main results are obtained. First, the aging country endogenously becomes a small country exporting the capital-intensive good, whereas the younger country endogenously dominates the world economy determining the world prices, in the free trade steady state. Second, although uncompensated free trade cannot be Pareto superior to autarky, there exists a compensation scheme applied within each country such that free trade is Pareto superior to autarky.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165-1889(09)00042-6
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control.

Volume (Year): 33 (2009)
Issue (Month): 8 (August)
Pages: 1531-1542

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Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:33:y:2009:i:8:p:1531-1542
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jedc

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