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Endogenous fiscal policy and capital market transmissions in the presence of demographic shocks

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  • Tosun, Mehmet Serkan

Abstract

Previous analyses of population aging mainly focused on the social security implications of the aging trend. This paper addresses aging in an open economy framework with two regions that have politically responsive fiscal policy regarding education finance. Demographic shocks start an economic growth process but results are sensitive to a critical parameter in the model that indicates return to education spending. Low values of this parameter are associated with less favorable economic outcomes. Hence, a policy implication emerges that enhancing the education system might pay off in terms of easing the negative growth and welfare consequences of expected demographic shocks.

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  • Tosun, Mehmet Serkan, 2008. "Endogenous fiscal policy and capital market transmissions in the presence of demographic shocks," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 2031-2060, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:32:y:2008:i:6:p:2031-2060
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    Cited by:

    1. Tetsuo Ono, 2014. "Intergenerational Politics, Government Debt, and Economic Growth," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 14-23-Rev.2, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Jun 2015.
    2. Ono, Tetsuo & Uchida, Yuki, 2016. "Pensions, education, and growth: A positive analysis," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 127-143.
    3. Mehmet S Tosun, 2005. "Global Aging and Fiscal Policy with International Labor Mobility; A Political Economy Perspective," IMF Working Papers 05/140, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Tetsuo Ono, 2015. "Public education and social security: a political economy approach," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 1-25, February.
    5. Tetsuo Ono, 2014. "Economic Growth and the Politics of Intergenerational Redistribution," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 14-17, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    6. Naito, Takumi & Zhao, Laixun, 2009. "Aging, transitional dynamics, and gains from trade," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1531-1542, August.
    7. Tosun, Mehmet S., 2011. "Demographic Divide and Labor Migration in the Euro-Mediterranean Region," IZA Discussion Papers 6188, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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