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Demographic Divide and Labor Migration in the Euro-Mediterranean Region


  • Tosun, Mehmet S.

    () (University of Nevada, Reno)


This paper provides a demographic outlook of the Euro-Mediterranean region and then shows the economic and fiscal consequences of such demographic differences within a two-region model with international labor mobility. International labor mobility is also examined through an externalities framework where brain drain from migration could be taxed by the home countries. Taxing the brain drain has a substantial limiting effect on labor migration and a small negative effect on per worker growth. On the other hand, it could be a solution to the negative externality problem associated with brain drain. It is also found that such tax can raise substantial tax revenue for the SMCs which could be used to enhance human capital in the region.

Suggested Citation

  • Tosun, Mehmet S., 2011. "Demographic Divide and Labor Migration in the Euro-Mediterranean Region," IZA Discussion Papers 6188, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6188

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Tosun, Mehmet Serkan, 2003. "Population aging and economic growth: political economy and open economy effects," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 291-296, December.
    2. Mehmet S Tosun, 2005. "Global Aging and Fiscal Policy with International Labor Mobility; A Political Economy Perspective," IMF Working Papers 05/140, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Kaul, Inge & Conceicao, Pedro & Le Goulven, Katell & Mendoza, Ronald U. (ed.), 2003. "Providing Global Public Goods: Managing Globalization," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195157413.
    4. Kaul, Inge & Grunberg, Isabelle & Stern, Marc (ed.), 1999. "Global Public Goods: International Cooperation in the 21st Century," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195130522.
    5. Straubhaar, Thomas, 2000. "Why do we need a general agreement on movements of people (GAMP)?," HWWA Discussion Papers 94, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    6. Mihir A. Desai & Devesh Kapur & John McHale, 2004. "Sharing the Spoils: Taxing International Human Capital Flows," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 11(5), pages 663-693, September.
    7. Börsch-Supan, Axel & Ludwig, Alexander & Winter, Joachim, 2004. "Aging, Pension Reform, and Capital Flows:," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 04-65, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
    8. Tosun, Mehmet Serkan, 2008. "Endogenous fiscal policy and capital market transmissions in the presence of demographic shocks," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 2031-2060, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zaiceva, A. & Zimmermann, K.F., 2016. "Migration and the Demographic Shift," Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, Elsevier.

    More about this item


    demographic divide; demographic deficit; population aging; youth bulge; labor mobility; brain drain; overlapping generations; endogenous tax policy; Mediterranean region;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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