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Marketing China's milk: A case study of the sales activity of dairy farmers in greater Beijing

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  • Huang, Jikun
  • Wu, Yunhua
  • Yang, Zhijian
  • Rozelle, Scott
  • Fabiosa, Jacinto
  • Dong, Fengxia

Abstract

Small farmer participation in marketing chains in emerging commodity markets and the determinants of their marketing channel choices are the center of many recent empirical and theoretical papers in the literature. The dairy sector is emerging in China. There are many fundamental questions about how farmers make dairy marketing decisions in China at the farm gate level that are unanswered. This makes the dairy sector in China a good place to study farmers in emerging marketing chains. Based on three sets of unique data collected in the mid-2000s in Greater Beijing, the analyses show that small farmers were the major producers of milk. There is no evidence that small farmers are being excluded from emerging marketing channels. One of the differences of China's dairy sector in the mid-2000s is that its marketing chain itself had many different types of agents that procure milk — and few of them were large; most were individual entrepreneurs. The high level of the competiveness may be the reason that individual agents do not have monopoly power and why small farmers can operate in the system.

Suggested Citation

  • Huang, Jikun & Wu, Yunhua & Yang, Zhijian & Rozelle, Scott & Fabiosa, Jacinto & Dong, Fengxia, 2012. "Marketing China's milk: A case study of the sales activity of dairy farmers in greater Beijing," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 675-689.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:23:y:2012:i:3:p:675-689
    DOI: 10.1016/j.chieco.2010.09.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Allan N. Rae & Hengyun Ma & Jikun Huang & Scott Rozelle, 2006. "Livestock in China: Commodity-Specific Total Factor Productivity Decomposition Using New Panel Data," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(3), pages 680-695.
    2. Frank Fuller & John Beghin & Scott Rozelle, 2007. "Consumption of dairy products in urban China: results from Beijing, Shangai and Guangzhou," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(4), pages 459-474, December.
    3. Jianqing Ruan & Xiaobo Zhang, 2009. "Finance and Cluster-Based Industrial Development in China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58(1), pages 143-164, October.
    4. Zhou, Zhang-Yue & Tian, Wei-Ming & Zhou, Jun-Lin, 2002. "The Emerging Dairy Economy in China: Production, Consumption and Trade Prospects," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 10.
    5. Huang, Zuhui & Zhang, Xiaobo & Zhu, Yunwei, 2008. "The role of clustering in rural industrialization: A case study of the footwear industry in Wenzhou," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 409-420, September.
    6. Rae, Allan N. & Ma, H. & Huang, J. & Rozelle, Scott, 2006. "AJAE Appendix: Livestock in China: Commodity-specific Total Factor Productivity Decomposition Using New Panel Data," American Journal of Agricultural Economics Appendices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(3), August.
    7. Gow, Hamish R & Swinnen, Johan F M, 1998. "Up- and Downstream Restructuring, Foreign Direct Investment, and Hold-Up Problems in Agricultural Transition," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 25(3), pages 331-350.
    8. Huang, Jikun & Liu, Yu & Martin, Will & Rozelle, Scott, 2009. "Changes in trade and domestic distortions affecting China's agriculture," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 407-416, October.
    9. Pokhrel, Deepak M. & Thapa, Gopal B., 2007. "Are marketing intermediaries exploiting mountain farmers in Nepal? A study based on market price, marketing margin and income distribution analyses," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 151-164, May.
    10. Dinghuan Hu & Thomas Reardon & Scott Rozelle & Peter Timmer & Honglin Wang, 2004. "The Emergence of Supermarkets with Chinese Characteristics: Challenges and Opportunities for China's Agricultural Development," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 22, pages 557-586, September.
    11. Wang, Honglin & Dong, Xiaoxia & Rozelle, Scott & Huang, Jikun & Reardon, Thomas, 2009. "Producing and Procuring Horticultural Crops with Chinese Characteristics: The Case of Northern China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 1791-1801, November.
    12. Zhou, Zhang-Yue & Tian, Wei-Ming & Zhou, Jun-Lin, 2002. "The Emerging Dairy Economy in China: Production, Consumption and Trade Prospects," 2002 Conference (46th), February 13-15, 2002, Canberra 174063, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhong, Zhen & Chen, Shufen & Kong, Xiangzhi & Tracy, Megan, 2014. "Why improving agrifood quality is difficult in China: Evidence from dairy industry," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 74-83.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Marketing activity; Dairy farmers; Marketing channel; Greater Beijing;

    JEL classification:

    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness
    • M31 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Marketing and Advertising - - - Marketing

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