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Employment status mobility from a life-cycle perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Fernando Muñoz-Bullón

    (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

  • Miguel A. Malo

    (Universidad de Salamanca)

Abstract

In this paper we apply optimal matching techniques to individual work-histories in the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), with a two-fold objective. First, to explore the usefulness of this sequence-oriented approach to analyze work-histories. Second, to analyze the impact of involuntary job separations on life courses. The study covers the whole range of employment statuses, including unemployment and inactivity periods, from the first job held to the year 1993. Our main findings are the following: (i) mobility in employment status has increased along the twentieth century; (ii) it has become more similar between men and women; (iii) birth cohorts in the second half of the century have especially been affected by involuntary job separations; (iv) in general, involuntary job separations provoke employment status sequences which substantially differ from the typical sequence in each cohort.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernando Muñoz-Bullón & Miguel A. Malo, 2003. "Employment status mobility from a life-cycle perspective," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 9(7), pages 119-162, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:9:y:2003:i:7
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol9/7/9-7.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Carlos Garcia-Serrano, 1999. "Job Tenure and Job Mobility in Britain," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(1), pages 43-70, October.
    2. Jacobson, Louis S & LaLonde, Robert J & Sullivan, Daniel G, 1993. "Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 685-709, September.
    3. Mincer, Jacob & Polachek, Solomon, 1974. "Family Investment in Human Capital: Earnings of Women," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(2), pages 76-108, Part II, .
    4. Patricio Solis & Francesco C. Billari, 2002. "Work lives amid social change and continuity: occupational trajectories in Monterrey, Mexico," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2002-009, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Mary Corcoran & Greg J. Duncan, 1979. "Work History, Labor Force Attachment, and Earnings Differences between the Races and Sexes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(1), pages 3-20.
    6. Farber, Henry S, 1994. "The Analysis of Interfirm Worker Mobility," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(4), pages 554-593, October.
    7. Andrew Hildreth & Stephen Millard & Dale Mortensen & Mark Taylor, 1998. "Wages, work, and unemployment," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(11), pages 1531-1547.
    8. Duncan McVicar & Michael Anyadike-Danes, 2002. "Predicting successful and unsuccessful transitions from school to work by using sequence methods," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 165(2), pages 317-334.
    9. Creedy, John & Disney, Richard, 1981. "Changes in Labour Market States in Great Britain," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 28(1), pages 76-85, February.
    10. Pau Baizán & Francesca Michielin & Francesco Billari, 2002. "Political Economy and Life Course Patterns," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 6(8), pages 191-240, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Malo, Miguel A. & Muñoz-Bullón, Fernando, 2007. "Breaks in women's careers due to family reasons: a long-term perspective," DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB wb070101, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
    2. Miguel Malo & Fernando Muñoz-Bullón, 2008. "Women’s family-related career breaks: a long-term British perspective," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 127-167, June.
    3. Julia Simonson & Laura Romeu Gordo & Nadiya Kelle, 2011. "The Double German Transformation: Changing Male Employment Patterns in East and West Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 391, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Schimke, Antje, 2014. "Aging workforce and firm growth in the context of "extreme" employment growth events," Working Paper Series in Economics 54, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Economics and Business Engineering.
    5. Helena Corrales Herrero & Beatriz Rodríguez Prado, 2011. "Characterizing Spanish Labour Pathways of young people with vocational lower-secondary education," Post-Print hal-00712379, HAL.
    6. Schimke, Antje, 2014. "Ageing workforce and firm growth in the context of “extreme” employment growth events," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 86-100.
    7. Malo, Miguel A. & Muñoz-Bullón, Fernando, 2004. "Career breaks of women due to family reasons: a long-term perspective using retrospective data," DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB wb041808, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
    8. Schimke, Antje, 2012. "Entrepreneurial aging and employment growth in the context of extreme growth events," Working Paper Series in Economics 39, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Economics and Business Engineering.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cohort analysis; employment; employment status mobility; involuntary job separations; optimal matching analysis; work-life history analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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