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Breaks In Women'S Careers Due To Family Reasons: A Long-Term Perspective

  • Miguel A. Malo

    ()

  • Fernando Muñoz-Bullon

    ()

We analyse whether family-related quits present long-term effects upon women’s careers, which are summarized in three measures of occupational prestige. There is an association between intermittent attachment to the labour market and being engaged in occupations with lower prestige levels. In causal terms, we find that women choose jobs with lower occupational prestige anticipating future family-related quits. The database consists of the retrospective information of the British Household Panel Survey

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Paper provided by Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía de la Empresa in its series Business Economics Working Papers with number wb070101.

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Date of creation: Jan 2007
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Handle: RePEc:cte:wbrepe:wb070101
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  1. O'Neill, June, 1985. "The Trend in the Male-Female Wage Gap in the United States," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages S91-116, January.
  2. Nickell, Stephen, 1982. "The Determinants of Occupational Success in Britain," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 43-53, January.
  3. Jacob Mincer & Solomon Polachek, 1974. "Family Investments in Human Capital: Earnings of Women," NBER Chapters, in: Marriage, Family, Human Capital, and Fertility, pages 76-110 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Hausman, Jerry A, 1978. "Specification Tests in Econometrics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1251-71, November.
  5. Sicherman, Nachum & Galor, Oded, 1990. "A Theory of Career Mobility," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(1), pages 169-92, February.
  6. Frank, Robert H, 1978. "Why Women Earn Less: The Theory and Estimation of Differential Overqualification," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(3), pages 360-73, June.
  7. Miguel A. Malo & Fernando Muñoz-Bullón, 2003. "Long-Term Effects Of Involuntary Job Separations On Labour Careers," Business Economics Working Papers wb034211, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
  8. Robst, John & VanGilder, Jennifer, 2000. "Atrophy rates in male and female occupations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 407-413, December.
  9. Fernando Muñoz-Bullón & Miguel A. Malo, 2003. "Employment status mobility from a life-cycle perspective," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 9(7), pages 119-162, October.
  10. Polachek, Solomon William, 1975. "Differences in Expected Post-school Investments as a Determinant of Market Wage Differentials," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 16(2), pages 451-70, June.
  11. Gronau, Reuben, 1973. "The Effect of Children on the Housewife's Value of Time," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages S168-99, Part II, .
  12. Mary Corcoran & Greg J. Duncan, 1979. "Work History, Labor Force Attachment, and Earnings Differences between the Races and Sexes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(1), pages 3-20.
  13. Marin, Alan & Psacharopoulos, George, 1982. "The Reward for Risk in the Labor Market: Evidence from the United Kingdom and a Reconciliation with Other Studies," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(4), pages 827-53, August.
  14. Jacob Mincer & Haim Ofek, 1982. "Interrupted Work Careers: Depreciation and Restoration of Human Capital," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(1), pages 3-24.
  15. Even, William E, 1987. "Career Interruptions Following Childbirth," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(2), pages 255-77, April.
  16. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
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