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Career breaks of women due to family reasons: a long-term perspective using retrospective data

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  • Malo, Miguel A.
  • Muñoz-Bullón, Fernando

Abstract

In this article, we analyse whether family-related quits present long-term effects upon women's careers, and the magnitude of such effects. For this purpose, the impact of family-related breaks in the first ten years of their labour careers on three measures of occupational prestige is examined, using the British Household Panel Survey. Women who are intermittently attached to the labour market are found to work, on average, in occupations associated to significantly lower prestige levels. In particular, additional family-related interruptions have a negative impact that becomes persistent and cumulative. Moreover, the observed decrease in prestige levels is enhanced by the length of job separations.

Suggested Citation

  • Malo, Miguel A. & Muñoz-Bullón, Fernando, 2004. "Career breaks of women due to family reasons: a long-term perspective using retrospective data," DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB wb041808, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
  • Handle: RePEc:cte:wbrepe:wb041808
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frank, Robert H, 1978. "Why Women Earn Less: The Theory and Estimation of Differential Overqualification," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(3), pages 360-373, June.
    2. Even, William E, 1987. "Career Interruptions Following Childbirth," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(2), pages 255-277, April.
    3. Mincer, Jacob & Polachek, Solomon, 1974. "Family Investment in Human Capital: Earnings of Women," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(2), pages 76-108, Part II, .
    4. Reuben Gronau, 1974. "The Effect of Children on the Housewife's Value of Time," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, pages 457-490 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
    6. Marin, Alan & Psacharopoulos, George, 1982. "The Reward for Risk in the Labor Market: Evidence from the United Kingdom and a Reconciliation with Other Studies," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(4), pages 827-853, August.
    7. Fernando Muñoz-Bullón & Miguel A. Malo, 2003. "Employment status mobility from a life-cycle perspective," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 9(7), pages 119-162, October.
    8. Jacob Mincer & Haim Ofek, 1982. "Interrupted Work Careers: Depreciation and Restoration of Human Capital," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(1), pages 3-24.
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