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Predicting successful and unsuccessful transitions from school to work by using sequence methods

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  • Duncan McVicar
  • Michael Anyadike-Danes

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  • Duncan McVicar & Michael Anyadike-Danes, 2002. "Predicting successful and unsuccessful transitions from school to work by using sequence methods," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 165(2), pages 317-334.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:165:y:2002:i:2:p:317-334
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:cep:sticas:/122 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Thomas Barnay & Karine Briard, 2011. "Health and Early Retirement: Evidence from French Data for individuals," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(1), pages 324-341.
    3. Kelly, Elish & McGuinness, Seamus, 2015. "Impact of the Great Recession on unemployed and NEET individuals’ labour market transitions in Ireland," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 59-71.
    4. ALBERT VERDÚ, Cecilia & DAVIA, María A., 2010. "Education And Labour Market Transitions Amongst Compulsory Education Graduates And School Dropouts," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 10(3).
    5. Nicholas Longford & Ioana C. Salagean, 2013. "A study of the labour market trajectories in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg," Economics Working Papers 1396, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    6. Brzinsky-Fay, Christian, 2006. "Lost in transition: labour market entry sequences of school leavers in Europe," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment SP I 2006-111, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    7. Kitty Stewart, 2007. "Employment trajectories for mothers in low-skilled work: Evidence from the British Lone Parent Cohort," CASE Papers case122, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    8. Björn Nilsson, 2017. "The School-to-work transition in developing countries," Working Papers DT/2017/07, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    9. Marco Bonetti & Raffaella Piccarreta & Gaia Salford, 2013. "Parametric and Nonparametric Analysis of Life Courses: An Application to Family Formation Patterns," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(3), pages 881-902, June.
    10. Fernando Muñoz-Bullón & Miguel A. Malo, 2003. "Employment status mobility from a life-cycle perspective," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 9(7), pages 119-162, October.
    11. Duncan McVicar & Michael Anyadike-Danes, 2004. "Parallel Lives: Birth, Childhood and Adolescent Influences on Career Paths," Econometric Society 2004 Australasian Meetings 134, Econometric Society.
    12. Stewart, Kitty, 2007. "Employment trajectories for mothers in low-skilled work: evidence from the British lone parent cohort," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6215, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    13. McVicar, Duncan & Wooden, Mark & Fok, Yin King, 2017. "Contingent Employment and Labour Market Pathways: Bridge or Trap?," IZA Discussion Papers 10768, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00168-016-0771-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Helena Corrales Herrero & Beatriz Rodríguez Prado, 2011. "Characterizing Spanish Labour Pathways of young people with vocational lower-secondary education," Post-Print hal-00712379, HAL.
    16. Anyadike-Danes, Michael & McVicar, Duncan, 2005. "You'll never walk alone: Childhood influences and male career path clusters," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 511-530, August.
    17. Mike Smet & Barbara Janssens, 2015. "Educational Pathways of students who enrolled in a subject-specific teacher training in Flanders: An Optimal Matching Approach," EcoMod2015 8577, EcoMod.
    18. Piccarreta, Raffaella, 2010. "Binary trees for dissimilarity data," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 54(6), pages 1516-1524, June.
    19. Gabadinho, Alexis & Ritschard, Gilbert & Müller, Nicolas S & Studer, Matthias, 2011. "Analyzing and Visualizing State Sequences in R with TraMineR," Journal of Statistical Software, Foundation for Open Access Statistics, vol. 40(i04).
    20. Verhaest, Dieter & Schatteman, Tom, 2010. "Overeducation in the early career: an analysis using sequence techniques," Working Papers 2010/09, Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel, Faculteit Economie en Management.
    21. Kelly, Elish & McGuinness, Seamus & O'Connell, Philip J., 2011. "Transitions to Long-Term Unemployment Risk Among Young People: Evidence from Ireland," Papers WP394, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).

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