IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/apeclt/v13y2006i10p665-673.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Returns to qualifications and occupation for males and females: evidence from the British Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS) 1998

Author

Listed:
  • A. Nikolaou
  • I. Theodossiou

Abstract

This study explores the returns to qualifications by occupation for males and females by utilizing a matched employer-employee dataset. It shows that educational qualifications are of a major and significant importance in explaining earnings variation but the effect progressively disappears as one examines their impact at lower ranks of occupational status. Thus, it appears that precisely where workers are located in terms of occupation will determine the pay that they are likely to receive.

Suggested Citation

  • A. Nikolaou & I. Theodossiou, 2006. "Returns to qualifications and occupation for males and females: evidence from the British Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS) 1998," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(10), pages 665-673.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:13:y:2006:i:10:p:665-673 DOI: 10.1080/13504850500401981
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&doi=10.1080/13504850500401981&magic=repec&7C&7C8674ECAB8BB840C6AD35DC6213A474B5
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hartog, Joop, 2000. "Over-education and earnings: where are we, where should we go?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 131-147, April.
    2. Marta Sanmartin, 2001. "Linearity of the return to education and self selection," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(1), pages 133-142.
    3. Harmon, Colm & Walker, Ian, 1995. "Estimates of the Economic Return to Schooling for the United Kingdom," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1278-1286.
    4. David Armstrong & Duncan McVicar, 2000. "Value added in further education and vocational training in Northern Ireland," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(13), pages 1727-1736.
    5. Theocharoula Magoula & George Psacharopoulos, 1999. "Schooling and monetary rewards in Greece: an over-education false alarm?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(12), pages 1589-1597.
    6. Adriaan Kalwij, 2000. "Estimating the economic return to schooling on the basis of panel data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(1), pages 61-71.
    7. Lester C. Thurow, 1998. "Wage Dispersion: “Who Done It?”," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 25-37, September.
    8. Arnaud Chevalier, 2003. "Measuring Over-education," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 70(279), pages 509-531, August.
    9. Michael Kidd & Todd Goninon, 2000. "Female concentration and the gender wage differential in the United Kingdom," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(5), pages 337-340.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:13:y:2006:i:10:p:665-673. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEL20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.