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Understanding Consumer Interest in Organics: Production Values vs. Purchasing Behavior

Author

Listed:
  • Bellows Anne C.

    (Universität Hohenheim)

  • Onyango Benjamin

    (Rutgers University)

  • Diamond Adam

    (USDA, Agricultural Marketing Service)

  • Hallman William K

    (Rutgers University)

Abstract

Extensive research exists on who does or might purchase organic food products, however little research has addressed either who values organic production methods when deciding what to eat, and correspondingly, who does not purchase organics regularly. This paper reports that values about organic farming often do not translate into corresponding stated preferences about organic food consumption behavior. The paradox is examined within the context of the consumers socio-demographic characteristics as well as through opinions and preferences related to food in their lives.Results show that consumer claims of buying organics and placing importance on organic production systems when deciding what to eat are highly correlated (.472 at 1% significance level; p

Suggested Citation

  • Bellows Anne C. & Onyango Benjamin & Diamond Adam & Hallman William K, 2008. "Understanding Consumer Interest in Organics: Production Values vs. Purchasing Behavior," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-31, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bjafio:v:6:y:2008:i:1:n:2
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hallman, William K. & Hebden, W. Carl & Aquino, Helen L. & Cuite, Cara L. & Lang, John T., 2003. "Public Perceptions Of Genetically Modified Foods: A National Study Of American Knowledge And Opinion," Working Papers 18174, Rutgers University, Food Policy Institute.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gianluigi Guido & M. Prete & Alessandro Peluso & R. Maloumby-Baka & Carolina Buffa, 2010. "The role of ethics and product personality in the intention to purchase organic food products: a structural equation modeling approach," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 57(1), pages 79-102, March.
    2. Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov & Rudholm, Niklas, 2010. "Does Shelf-Labeling of Organic Foods Increase Sales? Results from a Natural Experiment," HUI Working Papers 36, HUI Research.
    3. Vega-Zamora, Manuela & Parras-Rosa, Manuel & Murgado-Armenteros, Eva María & Torres-Ruiz, Francisco José, 2013. "A Powerful Word: The Influence of the Term 'Organic' on Perceptions and Beliefs Concerning Food," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 16(4).
    4. Bergès, Fabian & Monier-Dilhan, Sylvette, 2013. "Do consumers buy organic food for sustainability or selfish reasons?," TSE Working Papers 13-372, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), revised Aug 2013.
    5. Friedrichsen, Jana & Engelmann, Dirk, 2013. "Who cares for social image? Interactions between intrinsic motivation and social image concerns," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79746, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Etilé, Fabrice & Teyssier, Sabrina, 2013. "Corporate social responsibility and the economics of consumer social responsibility," Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, Editions NecPlus, vol. 94(02), pages 221-259, June.
    7. Lelia Voinea & Dorin Vicentiu Popescu & Mihai Teodor Negrea, 2015. "Good Practices in Educating and Informing the New Generation of Consumers on Organic Foodstuffs," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 17(38), pages 488-488, February.
    8. Meyer, Andrew, 2015. "Does education increase pro-environmental behavior? Evidence from Europe," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 108-121.
    9. Friedrichsen, Jana, 2018. "Signals Sell: Product Lines when Consumers Differ Both in Taste for Quality and Image Concern," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 70, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    10. Van Loo, Ellen J. & Caputo, Vincenzina & Nayga, Rodolfo M. & Verbeke, Wim, 2014. "Consumers’ valuation of sustainability labels on meat," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 137-150.

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