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“A Definition at Last, But What Does it All Mean?†Newspaper Coverage of Organic Food Production and its Effects on Milk Purchases

  • Kiesel, Kristin
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    This paper estimates the effects of media coverage of organic food production on food purchases. Information from several data sources links national and local newspaper coverage to fluid milk purchases. An analysis of weekly store-level scanner data in a differences-in-differences approach results in a 5% increase in organic milk sales relative to conventional milk sales. Increases in intensity of news coverage increase this relative difference in sales. Differentiating effects by media context further suggests that product category specific coverage increases sales more than general coverage. Critical coverage does not result in significant effects on organic milk sales.

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    Article provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

    Volume (Year): 37 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 (April)

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:122316
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    1. Kiesel, Kristin & Villas-Boas, Sofia B, 2007. "Got organic milk? Consumer valuations of milk labels after the implementation of the USDA organic seal," CUDARE Working Paper Series 1024, University of California at Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Policy.
    2. Raj Chetty & Adam Looney & Kory Kroft, 2009. "Salience and taxation: theory and evidence," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2009-11, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Xavier Gabaix & David Laibson, 2006. "Shrouded Attributes, Consumer Myopia, and Information Suppression in Competitive Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(2), pages 505-540.
    4. Marks, Leonie A. & Kalaitzandonakes, Nicholas G. & Vickner, Steven S., 2003. "Evaluating Consumer Response to GM Foods: Some Methodological Considerations," CAFRI: Current Agriculture, Food and Resource Issues, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society, issue 04.
    5. Eliza M. Mojduszka & Julie A. Caswell, 2000. "A Test of Nutritional Quality Signaling in Food Markets Prior to Implementation of Mandatory Labeling," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(2), pages 298-309.
    6. Olivier Bonroy & Christos Constantatos, 2008. "On the use of labels in credence goods markets," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 237-252, June.
    7. David Buschena & Vincent Smith, 2005. "Do Voluntary Biotechnology Labels Matter to the Consumer? Evidence from the Fluid Milk Market," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(2), pages 378-392.
    8. Stefano DellaVigna & Ethan Kaplan, 2006. "The Fox News Effect: Media Bias and Voting," NBER Working Papers 12169, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2006. "What Drives Media Slant? Evidence from U.S. Daily Newspapers," NBER Working Papers 12707, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Shimshack, Jay P. & Ward, Michael B. & Beatty, Timothy K.M., 2007. "Mercury advisories: Information, education, and fish consumption," MPRA Paper 25995, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Glaser, Lewrene K. & Thompson, Gary D., 2000. "Demand For Organic And Conventional Beverage Milk," 2000 Annual Meeting, June 29-July 1, 2000, Vancouver, British Columbia 36346, Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    12. Mario F. Teisl & Nancy E. Bockstael & Alan Levy, 2001. "Measuring the Welfare Effects of Nutrition Information," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 133-149.
    13. Jay Shimshack, 2004. "Are Mercury Advisories Effective? Inofrmation, Education, and Fish Consumption," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0423, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
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