IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/agrhuv/v17y2000i3p285-295.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Not in my body: BGH and the rise of organic milk

Author

Listed:
  • E. DuPuis

    ()

Abstract

The advent of rBGH (recombinant bovinegrowth hormone) has spurred the establishment of anorganic milk industry. The food systems/commoditychain analytical framework cannot fully explain therise of this new food. An adequate understanding ofthe consumer's role in the food system/commodity chainrequires more attention to consumption as a form ofpolitics. One way to do this is to look at thepolitics of other new social movements, especiallythose contesting mainstream notions of risk. From thisapproach, organic milk consumption challenges rBGHfrom a ``Not-in-my-Body'' or ``NIMB'' politics of refusal,similar to the political refusal of neighborhoodresidents in ``Not-in-My-Backyard'' or ``NIMBY''environmental movements. The NIMB form of politics isnot a social movement of politically consciousconsumers, yet it is still a political activity inwhich consumers participate in the formation of theindustry through a process of ``reflexive consumption.''An analysis of producer-consumer discourse on milkcartons reveals the nature of this political formation. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Suggested Citation

  • E. DuPuis, 2000. "Not in my body: BGH and the rise of organic milk," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 17(3), pages 285-295, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:17:y:2000:i:3:p:285-295
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1007604704026
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1023/A:1007604704026
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. T Marsden & N Wrigley, 1995. "Regulation, Retailing, and Consumption," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 27(12), pages 1899-1912, December.
    2. Manchester, Alden C. & Blayney, Donald P., 1997. "Structure of Dairy Markets: Past, Present, Future," Agricultural Economics Reports 33929, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. T K Marsden & A Arce, 1995. "Constructing Quality: Emerging Food Networks in the Rural Transition," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 27(8), pages 1261-1279, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:ags:jrapmc:122316 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Gifford, Katie & Bernard, John C., 2004. "The Impact of Message Framing on Organic Food Purchase Likelihood," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 35(03), November.
    3. Kiesel Kristin & Villas-Boas Sofia B, 2007. "Got Organic Milk? Consumer Valuations of Milk Labels after the Implementation of the USDA Organic Seal," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-40, April.
    4. repec:spr:agrhuv:v:35:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10460-017-9822-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Olson, Julia & Clay, Patricia M. & Pinto da Silva, Patricia, 2014. "Putting the seafood in sustainable food systems," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 104-111.
    6. Theodore L. Waldron & Greg Fisher & Michael Pfarrer, 2016. "How Social Entrepreneurs Facilitate the Adoption of New Industry Practices We thank guest editor Gideon Markman and the reviewers for their exceptional guidance during the review process. We also than," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(5), pages 821-845, July.
    7. Robert Chiles, 2013. "If they come, we will build it: in vitro meat and the discursive struggle over future agrofood expectations," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 30(4), pages 511-523, December.
    8. Raynolds, Laura T., 2004. "The Globalization of Organic Agro-Food Networks," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 725-743, May.
    9. Elisa Giampietri & Dieter B. A. Koemle & Xiaohua Yu & Adele Finco, 2016. "Consumers’ Sense of Farmers’ Markets: Tasting Sustainability or Just Purchasing Food?," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(11), pages 1-14, November.
    10. Vanloqueren, Gaëtan & Baret, Philippe V., 2009. "How agricultural research systems shape a technological regime that develops genetic engineering but locks out agroecological innovations," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 971-983, July.
    11. I. Vermeir & W. Verbeke, 2004. "Sustainable Food Consumption: Exploring The Consumer Attitude – Behaviour Gap," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 04/268, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:17:y:2000:i:3:p:285-295. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.