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Organic and conventional agriculture: Materializing discourse and agro-ecological managerialism

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  • David Goodman

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Abstract

This introduction situates key themesfound in papers given at a recent workshop on thechanging material practices, meanings, and regulationof US organic food production. The context is theemergence of an international bio-politics ofagriculture and food and, more particularly in the US,the contradictions of sustainable agriculturemovements catalyzed by the rapid scaling up of organicagriculture from a niche activity to nascentindustry. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Suggested Citation

  • David Goodman, 2000. "Organic and conventional agriculture: Materializing discourse and agro-ecological managerialism," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 17(3), pages 215-219, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:17:y:2000:i:3:p:215-219
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1007650924982
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Erin Nelson & Laura Gómez Tovar & Elodie Gueguen & Sally Humphries & Karen Landman & Rita Schwentesius Rindermann, 2016. "Participatory guarantee systems and the re-imagining of Mexico’s organic sector," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 33(2), pages 373-388, June.
    2. Ryan E. Galt, 2013. "The Moral Economy Is a Double-edged Sword: Explaining Farmers’ Earnings and Self-exploitation in Community-Supported Agriculture," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 89(4), pages 341-365, October.
    3. repec:spr:agrhuv:v:35:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10460-017-9822-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Seufert, Verena & Ramankutty, Navin & Mayerhofer, Tabea, 2017. "What is this thing called organic? – How organic farming is codified in regulations," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 10-20.
    5. C. Hinrichs & Rick Welsh, 2003. "The effects of the industrialization of US livestock agriculture on promoting sustainable production practices," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 20(2), pages 125-141, June.
    6. Erin Nelson & Laura Gómez Tovar & Rita Schwentesius Rindermann & Manuel Gómez Cruz, 2010. "Participatory organic certification in Mexico: an alternative approach to maintaining the integrity of the organic label," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 27(2), pages 227-237, June.
    7. Erin Nelson & Steffanie Scott & Judie Cukier & Ángel Galán, 2009. "Institutionalizing agroecology: successes and challenges in Cuba," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 26(3), pages 233-243, September.
    8. repec:spr:agrhuv:v:34:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10460-017-9776-x is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:aoj:agafsr:2017:p:37-44 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Steven C. Blank & Gary D. Thompson, 2004. "Can/Should/Will A Niche Become the Norm? Organic Agriculture's Short Past and Long Future," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(4), pages 483-503, October.
    11. Gustav Cederlöf, 2016. "Low-carbon food supply: the ecological geography of Cuban urban agriculture and agroecological theory," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 33(4), pages 771-784, December.

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