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The economic effects of facilitating the flow of rural workers to urban employment in China

Author

Listed:
  • Yinhua Mai
  • Xiujian Peng
  • Peter Dixon
  • Maureen Rimmer

Abstract

type="main" xml:lang="es"> Se investigan los efectos económicos de la relajación del sistema de registro de hogares de China durante el período 2008 a 2020 mediante el empleo de un modelo de equilibrio general computable dinámico de la economía china. Los resultados del modelo muestran que la reducción de la restricción institucional al desplazamiento de la fuerza laboral rural alentaría a los trabajadores rurales a trasladarse desde los sectores agrícolas y rurales no agrícolas a los sectores urbanos. Esta mejora en el desplazamiento laboral no sólo aumentaría el PIB de China y el consumo real de los hogares, sino que también aumentaría los salarios reales de los trabajadores agrícolas y rurales no agrícolas. Aunque el salario real de los trabajadores migrantes rurales aumentaría a un ritmo ligeramente menor que en el escenario de la línea de base, los trabajadores migrantes rurales seguirían estando considerablemente mejor pagados que los trabajadores agrícolas y rurales no agrícolas.

Suggested Citation

  • Yinhua Mai & Xiujian Peng & Peter Dixon & Maureen Rimmer, 2014. "The economic effects of facilitating the flow of rural workers to urban employment in China," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(3), pages 619-642, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:presci:v:93:y:2014:i:3:p:619-642
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/pirs.12004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Menzies, Gordon & Xiao, Sylvia Xiaolin & Dixon, Peter & Peng, Xiujian & Rimmer, Maureen, 2016. "Rural-led exchange rate appreciation in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 15-30.
    2. repec:taf:applec:v:48:y:2016:i:42:p:4019-4032 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Zhao, Jing & Ni, Hongzhen & Peng, Xiujian & Li, Jifeng & Chen, Genfa & Liu, Jinhua, 2016. "Impact of water price reform on water conservation and economic growth in China," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 90-103.

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