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The effects of facilitating the flow of rural workers to urban employment in China

Listed author(s):
  • Yinhua Mai
  • Xiujian Peng
  • Peter B. Dixon
  • Maureen T. Rimmer

The Second Agricultural Survey in China revealed that during 2006 about 130 million rural workers spent more than a month working outside the township of their residence. Most of these migrant workers engaged in industrial and services activities. They have played an increasingly important role in China's economic development. In this paper we introduce model mechanisms capturing demand and supply characteristics for these migrant workers under a MONASH-style dynamic Computable General Equilibrium framework. The model, SICGE (State Information Centre General Equilibrium), is applied in this study to analyse the effects of reducing institutional restrictions to the flow of rural labour to urban employment.

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Paper provided by Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre in its series Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers with number g-188.

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Date of creation: Nov 2009
Handle: RePEc:cop:wpaper:g-188
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  1. Hertel, Thomas & Zhai, Fan, 2006. "Labor market distortions, rural-urban inequality and the opening of China's economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 76-109, January.
  2. SHI, Xiaoping & Heerink, Nico & Qu, Futian, 2007. "Choices between different off-farm employment sub-categories: An empirical analysis for Jiangxi Province, China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 438-455.
  3. Xu, Yingfeng, 1994. "Trade liberalization in China: A CGE model with Lewis' rural surplus labor," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 205-219.
  4. Gilbert, John & Wahl, Thomas, 2003. "Labor market distortions and China's WTO accession package:: an applied general equilibrium assessment," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 774-794, December.
  5. Anderson, Kym & Huang, Jikun & Ianchovichina, Elena, 2004. "Will China's WTO accession worsen farm household incomes?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 443-456.
  6. Peter B. Dixon & Martin Johnson & Maureen T. Rimmer, 2011. "Economy‐Wide Effects Of Reducing Illegal Immigrants In U.S. Employment," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 29(1), pages 14-30, 01.
  7. Peter B. Dixon & Maureen T. Rimmer, 2003. "A New Specification of Labour Supply in the MONASH Model with an Illustrative Application," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 36(1), pages 22-40.
  8. Seeborg, Michael C. & Jin, Zhenhu & Zhu, Yiping, 2000. "The new rural-urban labor mobility in China: Causes and implications," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 39-56.
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