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Job Satisfaction and the Labor Market Institutions in Urban China

  • Heywood, John S.

    ()

    (University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee)

  • Siebert, W. Stanley

    ()

    (University of Birmingham)

  • Wei, Xiangdong

    ()

    (Lingnan University)

The determinants of worker job satisfaction are estimated using a representative survey of three major cities in China. Legally segregated migrants, floaters, earn significantly less than otherwise equivalent non-migrants but routinely report greater job satisfaction, a finding not previously reported. We confirm a positive role for membership in the communist party but find that it exists only for non-migrants suggesting a club good aspect to membership. In contrast to earlier studies, many controls mirror those found in western democracies including the "paradox of the contented female worker."

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 4254.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4254
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  1. Nielsen, Ingrid & Smyth, Russell, 2008. "Job satisfaction and response to incentives among China's urban workforce," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1921-1936, October.
  2. Krueger, Alan B. & Schkade, David A., 2007. "The Reliability of Subjective Well-Being Measures," IZA Discussion Papers 2724, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. John S. Heywood & W. S. Siebert & Xiangdong Wei, 2002. "Worker Sorting and Job Satisfaction: The Case of Union and Government Jobs," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 55(4), pages 595-609, July.
  4. Bai, Chong-En & Lu, Jiangyong & Tao, Zhigang, 2009. "How does privatization work in China?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 453-470, September.
  5. Keith A. Bender & Susan M. Donohue & John S. Heywood, 2005. "Job satisfaction and gender segregation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(3), pages 479-496, July.
  6. Margaret Maurer-Fazio & Ngan Dinh, 2004. "Differential rewards to, and contributions of, education in urban China's segmented labor markets," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(3), pages 173-189, October.
  7. Asiedu, Kofi Fred & Folmer, Henk, 2007. "Does Privatization Improve Job Satisfaction? The Case of Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 1779-1795, October.
  8. Hongbin Li & PakWai Liu & Junsen Zhang & Ning Ma, 2007. "Economic Returns to Communist Party Membership: Evidence From Urban Chinese Twins," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(523), pages 1504-1520, October.
  9. Andrew E. Clark and Andrew J. Oswald, . "Satisfaction and Comparison Income," Economics Discussion Papers 419, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  10. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1999. "The Changing Distribution of Job Satisfaction," NBER Working Papers 7332, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Richard B. Freeman & Douglas Kruse & Joseph Blasi, 2007. "The Same Yet Different: Worker Reports on Labour Practices and Outcomes in a Single Firm Across Countries," NBER Working Papers 13233, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Hongbin Li & Pak Wai Liu & Ning Ma & Junsen Zhang, 2005. "Economic Returns to Communist Party Membership: Evidence from Chinese Twins," Discussion Papers 00015, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics.
  13. Liang, Zai & Chen, Yiu Por, 2004. "Migration and Gender in China: An Origin-Destination Linked Approach," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(2), pages 423-43, January.
  14. Zhao, Yaohui, 1999. "Labor Migration and Earnings Differences: The Case of Rural China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(4), pages 767-82, July.
  15. Nicolai Kristensen & Niels Westergaard-Nielsen, 2007. "Reliability of job satisfaction measures," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 273-292, June.
  16. Meng, Xin & Zhang, Junsen, 2001. "The Two-Tier Labor Market in Urban China: Occupational Segregation and Wage Differentials between Urban Residents and Rural Migrants in Shanghai," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 485-504, September.
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