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Job satisfaction and response to incentives among China's urban workforce

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  • Nielsen, Ingrid
  • Smyth, Russell

Abstract

This article examines job satisfaction and incentive structures among China's urban workforce. The main determinants of job satisfaction are found to be age, education, occupation and personal income. The criteria that Chinese urban employees considered most important when choosing a job were job stability, a high income and professional development. Employees who considered job stability, high income, professional development opportunities, work/life balance and provision of social insurance as being important when selecting a job were more likely to have higher levels of job satisfaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Nielsen, Ingrid & Smyth, Russell, 2008. "Job satisfaction and response to incentives among China's urban workforce," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1921-1936, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:37:y:2008:i:5:p:1921-1936
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Junyi Zhang & Yubing Xiong, 2015. "Effects of multifaceted consumption on happiness in life: a case study in Japan based on an integrated approach," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 62(2), pages 143-162, June.
    2. Ye Luo, 2016. "Gender and Job Satisfaction in Urban China: The Role of Individual, Family, and Job Characteristics," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 289-309, January.
    3. Heywood, John S. & Siebert, W. Stanley & Wei, Xiangdong, 2009. "Job Satisfaction and the Labor Market Institutions in Urban China," IZA Discussion Papers 4254, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Frank, Björn & Abulaiti, Gulimire & Herbas Torrico, Boris & Enkawa, Takao, 2013. "How do Asia's two most important consumer markets differ? Japanese–Chinese differences in customer satisfaction and its formation," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(12), pages 2397-2405.
    5. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2014. "It pays to be happy (if you are a man): Subjective wellbeing and the gender wage gap in Urban China," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(3), pages 392-414, May.
    6. Kit-Chun Lam & Pak-Wai Liu, 2014. "Socio-Economic Inequalities in Happiness in China and U.S," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 116(2), pages 509-533, April.
    7. Zhiming Cheng, 2014. "The Effects of Employee Involvement and Participation on Subjective Wellbeing: Evidence from Urban China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 118(2), pages 457-483, September.
    8. Russell Smyth & Ingrid Nielsen & Qingguo Zhai & Tiemin Liu & Yin Liu & C.Y. Tang & Zhihong Wang & Zuxiang Wang & Juyong Zhang, 2008. "Environmental Surroundings And Personal Well-Being In Urban China," Monash Economics Working Papers 32/08, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    9. Siu To & Hau Tam, 2014. "Generational Differences in Work Values, Perceived Job Rewards, and Job Satisfaction of Chinese Female Migrant Workers: Implications for Social Policy and Social Services," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 118(3), pages 1315-1332, September.
    10. GAO, Wenshu & SMYTH, Russell, 2010. "Job satisfaction and relative income in economic transition: Status or signal?: The case of urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 442-455, September.
    11. Kant, Shashi & Vertinsky, Ilan & Zheng, Bin & Smith, Peggy M., 2014. "Multi-Domain Subjective Wellbeing of Two Canadian First Nations Communities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 140-157.
    12. Ye Luo, 2016. "Gender and Job Satisfaction in Urban China: The Role of Individual, Family, and Job Characteristics," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 289-309, January.
    13. You, Jing & Wang, Shaoyang, 2016. "Unemployment Duration and Job-Match Quality in Urban China: The Dynamic Impact of 2008 Labor Contract Law," MPRA Paper 72767, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Xiong, Ailun & Li, Hongyi & Westlund, Hans & Pu, Yongjian, 2017. "Social networks, job satisfaction and job searching behavior in the Chinese labor market," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 1-15.
    15. Nie, Peng & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2017. "What Chinese Workers Value: An Analysis of Job Satisfaction, Job Expectations, and Labor Turnover in China," IZA Discussion Papers 10963, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Alexander Newman & Ingrid Nielsen & Russell Smyth & Angus Hooke, 2015. "Examining the Relationship Between Workplace Support and Life Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Job Satisfaction," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 120(3), pages 769-781, February.

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