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A Monetary Business Cycle Model For India

Author

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  • Shesadri Banerjee
  • Parantap Basu
  • Chetan Ghate

Abstract

A New Keynesian monetary business cycle model is constructed to study why monetary transmission in India is weak. Our models feature banking and financial sector frictions as well as an informal sector. The predominant channel of monetary transmission is a credit channel. Our main finding is that base money shocks have a larger and more persistent effect on output than an interest rate shock, as in the data. The presence of an informal sector hinders monetary transmission. Contrary to the consensus view, financial repression in the form of a statutory liquidity ratio and administered interest rates, does not weaken monetary transmission. (JEL E31, E32, E44, E52, E63)

Suggested Citation

  • Shesadri Banerjee & Parantap Basu & Chetan Ghate, 2020. "A Monetary Business Cycle Model For India," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 58(3), pages 1362-1386, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:58:y:2020:i:3:p:1362-1386
    DOI: 10.1111/ecin.12855
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    Cited by:

    1. Chetan Dave & Chetan Ghate & Pawan Gopalakrishnan & Suchismita Tarafdar, 2018. "Fiscal Austerity in Emerging Market Economies," Discussion Papers 18-05, Indian Statistical Institute, Delhi.
    2. Ghosh, Saurabh & Gopalakrishnan, Pawan & Satija, Sakshi, 2019. "Recapitalization in an Economy with State-Owned Banks - A DSGE Framework," MPRA Paper 96981, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Nandi, Aurodeep, 2019. "Fiscal deficit targeting alongside flexible inflation targeting: India’s fiscal policy transmission," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 1-18.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

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