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Do We Need More Time To Give Less? Experimental Evidence From Tunisia

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  • Gilles Grolleau
  • Angela Sutan
  • Sana El Harbi
  • Marwa Jedidi

Abstract

Using a laboratory dictator game in Tunisia, we investigate whether the donation level is influenced by the time allotted to take the giving decision. We found that when participants have more time to decide, they give less compared to a situation where they have less time to take their decision. Some policy and managerial implications are drawn.

Suggested Citation

  • Gilles Grolleau & Angela Sutan & Sana El Harbi & Marwa Jedidi, 2018. "Do We Need More Time To Give Less? Experimental Evidence From Tunisia," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(4), pages 400-409, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:buecrs:v:70:y:2018:i:4:p:400-409
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/boer.12163
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