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Instinctive and Cognitive Reasoning: A Study of Response Times

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  • Rubinstein, Ariel

Abstract

Lecture audiences and students were asked to respond to virtual decision and game situations at gametheory.tau.ac.il. Several thousand observations were collected and the response time for each answer was recorded. There were significant differences in response time across responses. It is suggested that choices made instinctively, that is, on the basis of an emotional response, require less response time than choices that require the use of cognitive reasoning.

Suggested Citation

  • Rubinstein, Ariel, 2006. "Instinctive and Cognitive Reasoning: A Study of Response Times," Economic Theory and Applications Working Papers 12181, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:feemet:12181
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.12181
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    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/12181/files/wp060036.pdf
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics;

    JEL classification:

    • C9 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments

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