IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/agecon/v49y2018i1p97-109.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Harmonization of food trade standards and regulations in ASEAN: the case of Malaysia's food imports

Author

Listed:
  • Evelyn S. Devadason
  • VGR Chandran
  • Kaliappa Kalirajan

Abstract

Regulatory heterogeneity continues to be identified as a challenge for food trade in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) as the progress of harmonization of food standards among member states remains slow. Using a new and comprehensive database on nontariff measures (NTMs), this article examines the coverage, frequency, and diversity of NTMs for the food sector in Malaysia, and then estimates their impact on food imports from ASEAN. The food sector in Malaysia is found to be highly regulated, dominated by technical measures, namely, labeling for sanitary and phytosanitary and technical barriers to trade reasons, product quality, and restricted substances. The empirical results subsequently verify that, overall, technical measures are import restrictive. This article therefore contends that harmonization of food standards and regulations at the regional level is important for enhancing trade. However, building common ground for food safety regulations should be NTM†and sector†specific, to realize progress in terms of regulatory convergence. This is particularly true for the food sector, since complete harmonization is not practical and not politically feasible.

Suggested Citation

  • Evelyn S. Devadason & VGR Chandran & Kaliappa Kalirajan, 2018. "Harmonization of food trade standards and regulations in ASEAN: the case of Malaysia's food imports," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 49(1), pages 97-109, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:49:y:2018:i:1:p:97-109
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/agec.12398
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hiau LooiKee & Alessandro Nicita & Marcelo Olarreaga, 2009. "Estimating Trade Restrictiveness Indices," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(534), pages 172-199, January.
    2. Chunlai Chen & Jun Yang & Christopher Findlay, 2008. "Measuring the Effect of Food Safety Standards on China’s Agricultural Exports," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 144(1), pages 83-106, April.
    3. Martijn Burger & Frank van Oort & Gert-Jan Linders, 2009. "On the Specification of the Gravity Model of Trade: Zeros, Excess Zeros and Zero-inflated Estimation," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 167-190.
    4. Tsunehiro Otsuki & John S. Wilson, 2001. "What price precaution? European harmonisation of aflatoxin regulations and African groundnut exports," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 28(3), pages 263-284, October.
    5. Malouche, Mariem & Reyes, José-Daniel & Fouad, Amir, 2013. "Making Trade Policy More Transparent: A New Database of Non-Tariff Measures," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 128, pages 1-7, November.
    6. Otsuki, Tsunehiro & S. Wilson, John, 2003. "Food Safety and Trade: Winners and Losers in a Non-Harmonized World," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 18, pages 266-287.
    7. Mangelsdorf, Axel & Portugal-Perez, Alberto & Wilson, John S., 2012. "Food standards and exports: evidence for China," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(03), pages 507-526, July.
    8. Shepherd, Ben, 2007. "Product standards, harmonization, and trade : evidence from the extensive margin," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4390, The World Bank.
    9. Zahoor Ul Haq & Karl Meilke & John Cranfield, 2013. "Selection bias in a gravity model of agrifood trade," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 40(2), pages 331-360, March.
    10. Baller, Silja, 2007. "Trade effects of regional standards liberalization : a heterogeneous firms approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4124, The World Bank.
    11. Unnevehr, Laurian J., 2000. "Food safety issues and fresh food product exports from LDCs," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 23(3), pages 231-240, September.
    12. Nicodème Nimenya & Pascal-Firmin Ndimira & Bruno Henry de Frahan, 2012. "Tariff equivalents of nontariff measures: the case of European horticultural and fish imports from African countries," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 43(6), pages 635-653, November.
    13. Hooker, Neal H., 1999. "Food safety regulation and trade in food products," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 653-668, December.
    14. Jongwanich, Juthathip, 2009. "Impact of Food Safety Standards on Processed Food Exports from Developing Countries," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 154, Asian Development Bank.
    15. Jongwanich, Juthathip, 2009. "The impact of food safety standards on processed food exports from developing countries," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 447-457, October.
    16. repec:bla:agecon:v:47:y:2016:i:s1:p:7-19 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Unknown, 2003. "International Trade And Food Safety: Economic Theory And Case Studies," Agricultural Economics Reports 33941, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    18. Schuster, Monica & Maertens, Miet, 2015. "The Impact of Private Food Standards on Developing Countries’ Export Performance: An Analysis of Asparagus Firms in Peru," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 208-221.
    19. George Philippidis & Helena Resano-Ezcaray & Ana I. Sanjuán-López, 2013. "Capturing zero-trade values in gravity equations of trade: an analysis of protectionism in agro-food sectors," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(2), pages 141-159, March.
    20. Niven Winchester & Marie-Luise Rau & Christian Goetz & Bruno Larue & Tsunehiro Otsuki & Karl Shutes & Christine Wieck & Heloisa L. Burnquist & Maurício J. Pinto de Souza & Rosane Nunes de Faria, 2012. "The Impact of Regulatory Heterogeneity on Agri-food Trade," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(8), pages 973-993, August.
    21. Lin Sun & Michael R. Reed, 2010. "Impacts of Free Trade Agreements on Agricultural Trade Creation and Trade Diversion," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1351-1363.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:49:y:2018:i:1:p:97-109. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iaaeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.