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Trade liberalization in the bio-economy: coping with a new landscape

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  • Jean-Christophe Bureau
  • Sébastien Jean

Abstract

Multilateral trade liberalization has made little progress over the last period, but preferential agreements have multiplied. Recent economic literature helps to understand the current negotiation game. New economic and political conditions, in particular the gaining influence of emerging countries, make a multilateral agreement more difficult. Developed countries have given up many of their bargaining chips in previous rounds of negotiation and their remaining agricultural tariffs are not sufficient for extracting the concessions from emerging countries on services, procurement, and intellectual property that would make an agreement possible. The risk of a more fragmented world calls for a revised negotiation agenda and a change in the status of developing countries. Research issues are outlined in order to help revitalize the Doha negotiation agenda.
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Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Christophe Bureau & Sébastien Jean, 2013. "Trade liberalization in the bio-economy: coping with a new landscape," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(s1), pages 173-182, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:44:y:2013:i:s1:p:173-182
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/agec.2013.44.issue-s1
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    Cited by:

    1. Jean-Christophe Bureau & Thorsten Rogall, 2017. "EU Policies and Global Food Security," LICOS Discussion Papers 39217, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    2. Decreux, Yvan & Fontagné, Lionel, 2015. "What Next for Multilateral Trade Talks? Quantifying the Role of Negotiation Modalities," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(01), pages 29-43, January.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions

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