IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/zewdip/20007.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Beware of the employer: Financial incentives for employees may fail to prolong old age employment

Author

Listed:
  • Lorenz, Svenja
  • Pfister, Mona
  • Zwick, Thomas

Abstract

This paper shows that increasing the normal retirement age and introducing pension deductions for retirement before normal retirement age in Germany did not prolong employment of older men. The reason for this surprising result is that employers encouraged their employees to use the bridge options unemployment or partial retirement instead of the early retirement option for the long-term insured. Bridge options allowed employers to terminate employment considerably earlier than the pension for long-term insured. Employers however had to compensate their employees for the substantially higher costs of the bridge options. Therefore mainly employers with high employment adaption costs induced employees to use a bridge option during the implementation phase of the pension reform.

Suggested Citation

  • Lorenz, Svenja & Pfister, Mona & Zwick, Thomas, 2020. "Beware of the employer: Financial incentives for employees may fail to prolong old age employment," ZEW Discussion Papers 20-007, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:20007
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/214228/1/169096023X.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Axel H. Börsch-Supan & Courtney Coile, 2018. "Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: Reforms and Retirement Incentives – Introduction and Summary," NBER Working Papers 25280, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Barbara Berkel & Axel Börsch-Supan, 2004. "Pension Reform in Germany: The Impact on Retirement Decisions," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 60(3), pages 393-421, September.
    3. Cremer, Helmuth & Lozachmeur, Jean-Marie & Pestieau, Pierre, 2009. "Use and misuse of unemployment benefits for early retirement," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 174-185, June.
    4. Hanel, Barbara, 2010. "Financial incentives to postpone retirement and further effects on employment -- Evidence from a natural experiment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 474-486, June.
    5. Bönke, Timm & Kemptner, Daniel & Lüthen, Holger, 2018. "Effectiveness of early retirement disincentives: Individual welfare, distributional and fiscal implications," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 25-37.
    6. Welteke, Clara & Geyer, Johannes & Haan, Peter, 2016. "Early retirement eligibility and employment behavior: evidence from a cohort based pension reform," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145783, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Geyer, Johannes & Steiner, Viktor, 2014. "Future public pensions and changing employment patterns across birth cohorts," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(2), pages 172-209, April.
    8. Christian Grund, 2006. "Severance payments for dismissed employees in Germany," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 49-71, July.
    9. Engels, Barbara & Geyer, Johannes & Haan, Peter, 2017. "Pension incentives and early retirement," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 216-231.
    10. Krueger, Alan B & Pischke, Jorn-Steffen, 1992. "The Effect of Social Security on Labor Supply: A Cohort Analysis of the Notch Generation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(4), pages 412-437, October.
    11. Pfister, Mona & Lorenz, Svenja & Zwick, Thomas, 2018. "Calculation of pension entitlements in the sample of integrated labour market biographies (SIAB)," FDZ Methodenreport 201801_en, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    12. Lachowska, Marta & Sundén, Annika & Wadensjö, Eskil, 2009. "The Impact of a Phased Retirement Program: A Case Study," IZA Discussion Papers 4284, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    13. David Dorn & Alfonso Sousa-Poza, 2010. "'Voluntary' and 'involuntary' early retirement: an international analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(4), pages 427-438.
    14. Mastrobuoni, Giovanni, 2009. "Labor supply effects of the recent social security benefit cuts: Empirical estimates using cohort discontinuities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(11-12), pages 1224-1233, December.
    15. Elke J. Jahn, 2009. "Do firms obey the law when they fire workers? Social criteria and severance payments in Germany," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(7), pages 672-691, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cohort-specific pension reform; early retirement; partial retirement; unemployment; labor supply; labor demand;

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:20007. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/zemande.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.