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On the low-frequency relationship between public deficits and inflation

  • Kriwoluzky, Alexander
  • Kliem, Martin
  • Sarferaz, Samad

We estimate the low-frequency relationship between fiscal deficits and inflation and pay special attention to its potential time variation by estimating a time-varying VAR model for U.S. data from 1900 to 2011. We find the strongest relationship neither in times of crisis nor in times of high public deficits, but from the mid-1960s up to 1980. Our results suggest that the low-frequency relationship between fiscal deficits and inflation is strongly related to the conduct of monetary policy and its interaction with fiscal policy after World War II.

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Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order with number 80000.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:80000
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.socialpolitik.org/
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