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Dormant Shocks and Fiscal Virtue

  • Francesco Bianchi
  • Leonardo Melosi

We develop a theoretical framework to account for the observed instability of the link between inflation and fiscal imbalances across time and countries. Current policy makers’ behavior ‡influences agents’' beliefs about the way debt will be stabilized. The standard policy mix consists of a virtuous fiscal authority that moves taxes in response to debt and a central bank that has full control over inflation. When policy makers deviate from this Virtuous regime, agents conduct Bayesian learning to infer the likely duration of the deviation. As agents observe more and more deviations, they become increasingly pessimistic about a prompt return to the Virtuous regime and ‡inflation starts drifting in response to a fiscal imbalance. Shocks which were dormant under the Virtuous regime now start manifesting themselves. These changes are initially imperceptible, can unfold over decades, and accelerate as agents' ’beliefs deteriorate. Dormant shocks explain the run-up of US inflation and uncertainty in the ’70s. The currently low long term interest rates and inflation expectations might hide the true risk of inflation faced by the US economy.

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Paper provided by Duke University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 13-12.

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Length: 44
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:duk:dukeec:13-12
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics Duke University 213 Social Sciences Building Box 90097 Durham, NC 27708-0097
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