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Technology, trade, and growth: The role of education

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  • Prettner, Klaus
  • Strulik, Holger

Abstract

We generalize a trade model with firm-specific heterogeneity and R&D-based growth to allow for an endogenous education decision of households and an endogenously evolving population. Our framework is able to explain cross-country differences in living standards and trade intensities by the differential pace of human capital accumulation among industrialized countries. Consistent with the empirical evidence, scale matters for relative economic prosperity as long as countries are closed, whereas scale does not matter in a fully globalized world. Interestingly, however, the average human capital level of a country influences its relative economic prosperity irrespective of its trade-openness. While being consistent with the empirical evidence, our framework has the additional advantage that steady-state growth of income does not hinge on the unrealistic assumption of an ever expanding population.

Suggested Citation

  • Prettner, Klaus & Strulik, Holger, 2014. "Technology, trade, and growth: The role of education," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 191, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:cegedp:191
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    1. Eric Hanushek & Ludger Woessmann, 2012. "Do better schools lead to more growth? Cognitive skills, economic outcomes, and causation," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 267-321, December.
    2. Holger Strulik & Klaus Prettner & Alexia Prskawetz, 2013. "The past and future of knowledge-based growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 411-437, December.
    3. Angel de la Fuente & Rafael Doménech, 2006. "Human Capital in Growth Regressions: How Much Difference Does Data Quality Make?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(1), pages 1-36, March.
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    5. Dierk Herzer & Holger Strulik & Sebastian Vollmer, 2012. "The long-run determinants of fertility: one century of demographic change 1900–1999," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 357-385, December.
    6. Eaton, Jonathan & Kortum, Samuel, 2001. "Technology, trade, and growth: A unified framework," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 742-755, May.
    7. Daniel Cohen & Marcelo Soto, 2007. "Growth and human capital: good data, good results," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 51-76, March.
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    9. Edward L. Glaeser & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2004. "Do Institutions Cause Growth?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 271-303, September.
    10. Prettner, Klaus & Strulik, Holger, 2018. "Trade and productivity: The family connection redux," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 276-291.
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    Cited by:

    1. Koichi Fukumura & Kohei Nagamachi & Yasuhiro Sato & Kazuhiro Yamamoto, 2017. "Demographics, Immigration, and Market Size," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1059, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    2. Prettner, Klaus & Strulik, Holger, 2018. "Trade and productivity: The family connection redux," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 276-291.
    3. Chu, Angus C. & Furukawa, Yuichi & Zhu, Dongming, 2016. "Growth and parental preference for education in China," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 192-202.
    4. Koichi Fukumura & Kohei Nagamachi & Yasuhiro Sato & Kazuhiro Yamamoto, 2017. "Demographics, Immigration, and Market Size," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1048, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    technological progress; globalization; demographic change; education; human capital accumulation;

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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