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Response bias in job satisfaction surveys: English general practitioners

Author

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  • H Gravelle
  • AR Hole, I Hussein

Abstract

Job satisfaction may affect the propensity to respond to job satisfaction surveys, so that estimates of average satisfaction and the effects of determinants of satisfaction may be biased. We examine response bias using data from a postal job satisfaction survey of family doctors. We link all the sampled doctors to an administrative database and so have information on the characteristics of responders and non-responders. Allowing for selection increases the estimate of mean job satisfaction in 2005 and the estimated change in mean job satisfaction between 2004 and 2005. Estimates of the determinants of job satisfaction are generally insensitive to response bias.

Suggested Citation

  • H Gravelle & AR Hole, I Hussein, 2008. "Response bias in job satisfaction surveys: English general practitioners," Discussion Papers 08/24, Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:08/24
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    File URL: https://www.york.ac.uk/media/economics/documents/discussionpapers/2008/0824.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shields, Michael A. & Ward, Melanie, 2001. "Improving nurse retention in the National Health Service in England: the impact of job satisfaction on intentions to quit," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 677-701, September.
    2. Cameron,A. Colin & Trivedi,Pravin K., 2008. "Microeconometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9787111235767, April.
    3. George A. Akerlof & Andrew K. Rose & Janet L. Yellen, 1988. "Job Switching and Job Satisfaction in the U.S. Labor Market," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(2), pages 495-594.
    4. Lien, Da-Hsiang Donald, 1986. "Predicted and actual frequencies in binomial response models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 49-51.
    5. Clark, Andrew E., 2001. "What really matters in a job? Hedonic measurement using quit data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 223-242, May.
    6. Van de Ven, Wynand P. M. M. & Van Praag, Bernard M. S., 1981. "The demand for deductibles in private health insurance : A probit model with sample selection," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 229-252, November.
    7. Michael Rose, 2005. "Job Satisfaction in Britain: Coping with Complexity," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 43(3), pages 455-467, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Allen, Thomas & Whittaker, William & Sutton, Matt, 2017. "Does the proportion of pay linked to performance affect the job satisfaction of general practitioners?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 173(C), pages 9-17.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job satisfaction. Response bias. Sample selection. Family practitioners.;

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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