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How are Oil Revenues redistributed in an Oil Economy? The case of Kazakhstan

  • Boris Najman

    (ROSES-CNRS, University of Paris 1, France)

  • Richard Pomfret

    (University of Adelaide, Australia)

  • Gael Raballand

    (World Bank, Washington DC, USA)

  • Patricia Sourdin

    (University of Adelaide, Australia)

Kazakhstan’s economy has been driven by an oilboom since the discovery of large new oilfields coincided with the upturn of world oil prices after 1998. This paper uses national household expenditure survey data to examine whether Kazakhstan’s experience supports a curse or a blessing outcome. We assess the extent to which the benefits from the oilboom are retained in the oil-producing regions, or spread evenly across the national economy, or are concentrated in the cities where the country’s elite lives. We then analyze the data to determine the transmission mechanisms (higher wages, social transfers or informal income) from the oilboom to household expenditure.

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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Development and Comp Systems with number 0512012.

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Date of creation: 13 Dec 2005
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Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0512012
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  1. Richard Pomfret, 2003. "Economic Performance in Central Asia Since 1991: Macro and Micro Evidence1," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(4), pages 442-465, December.
  2. Kronenberg Tobias, 2003. "The Curse Of Natural Resources In The Transition Economies," Research Memorandum 012, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  3. Jovanovic, Branko, 2001. "Russian Roller Coaster: Expenditure Inequality and Instability in Russia, 1994-98," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 47(2), pages 251-71, June.
  4. Philip R. Lane & Aaron Tornell, 1999. "The Voracity Effect," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(1), pages 22-46, March.
  5. Ehtisham Ahmad & Raju Jan Singh, 2003. "Political Economy of Oil-Revenue Sharing in a Developing Country; Illustrations From Nigeria," IMF Working Papers 03/16, International Monetary Fund.
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  7. Korhonen, Iikka, 2004. "Does democracy cure a resource curse?," BOFIT Discussion Papers 18/2004, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  8. International Monetary Fund, 2003. "Republic of Kazakhstan; Selected Issues and Statistical Appendix," IMF Staff Country Reports 03/211, International Monetary Fund.
  9. Rama, Martin & Scott, Kinnon, 1999. "Labor Earnings in One-Company Towns: Theory and Evidence from Kazakhstan," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(1), pages 185-209, January.
  10. Era Dabla-Norris & Paul Wade, 2002. "The Challenge of Fiscal Decentralization in Transition Countries," IMF Working Papers 02/103, International Monetary Fund.
  11. Yelena Kalyuzhnova & Michael Kaser, 2005. "Prudential Management of Hydrocarbon Revenues in Resource-Rich Economies," ECE Discussion Papers Series 2005_4, UNECE.
  12. Jonathan Isham & Michael Woolcock & Lant Pritchett & Gwen Busby, 2003. "The Varieties of Resource Experience: How Natural Resource Export Structures Affect the Political Economy of Economic Growth," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0308, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  13. Era Dabla-Norris & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & John Norregaard, 2000. "Making Decentralization Work: The Case of Russia, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0009, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  14. King, S.P. & Wen, M., 1998. "Push or Pull? The relationship Between Development, Trade and Resource Endowment," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 653, The University of Melbourne.
  15. Robinson, James A & Torvik, Ragnar, 2002. "White Elephants," CEPR Discussion Papers 3459, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  16. Arvind Subramanian & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 2003. "Addressing the Natural Resource Curse; An Illustration From Nigeria," IMF Working Papers 03/139, International Monetary Fund.
  17. Alberto Dalmazzo & Guido de Blasio, 2003. "Resources and Incentives to Reform," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 50(2), pages 5.
  18. Richard Pomfret, 2003. "Trade and Exchange Rate Policies in Formerly Centrally Planned Economies," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(4), pages 585-612, 04.
  19. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew M. Warner, 1995. "Natural Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 5398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  20. Wen, Mei & King, Stephen P., 2004. "Push or pull? The relationship between development, trade and primary resource endowment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 53(4), pages 569-591, April.
  21. Papyrakis, Elissaios & Gerlagh, Reyer, 2004. "The resource curse hypothesis and its transmission channels," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 181-193, March.
  22. Anderson, Kathryn H. & Pomfret, Richard, 2002. "Relative Living Standards in New Market Economies: Evidence from Central Asian Household Surveys," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 683-708, December.
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