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Securitized Markets, International Capital Flows, and Global Welfare

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Abstract

We study the effect of collateralized lending and securitization on the global supply of securitized assets, welfare, and international net and gross capital flows in a two country general equilibrium model with idiosyncratic investment risk. The financial sectors in the two countries, Home and Foreign, differ by the collateral requirement for investment loans, with Home requiring lower margins. In autarky, Home endogenously supplies more assets and enables more risk sharing. Upon financial integration, capital flows from Foreign to Home, leading to lower interest rates and an increase in the global supply of assets. Foreign enjoys substantial welfare gains through better risk sharing and portfolio reallocation, while the welfare experience for Home is ambiguous. Gross capital flows arise when agents face aggregate shocks to the expected payoff to investment projects, but can collapse when shocks concern the variance of returns.

Suggested Citation

  • Gregory Phelan & Alexis Akira Toda, 2015. "Securitized Markets, International Capital Flows, and Global Welfare," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015-14, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jul 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2015-14
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ana Fostel & John Geanakoplos & Gregory Phelan, 2015. "Global Collateral: How Financial Innovation Drives Capital Flows and Increases Financial Instability," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015-12, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Feb 2017.
    2. William Chen & Gregory Phelan, 2017. "International Coordination of Macroprudential Policies with Capital Flows and Financial Asymmetries," Department of Economics Working Papers 2017-05, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Nov 2018.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    collateralized loan obligations; endogenous risk sharing; global imbalances; gross international asset positions;

    JEL classification:

    • D52 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Incomplete Markets
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors

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