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Financial Entanglement: A Theory of Incomplete Integration, Leverage, Crashes, and Contagion

Author

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  • Nicolae Gârleanu
  • Stavros Panageas
  • Jianfeng Yu

Abstract

We propose a unified model of limited market integration, asset-price determination, leveraging, and contagion. Investors and firms are located on a circle, and access to markets involves participation costs that increase with distance. Despite the ex-ante symmetry of investors, their strategies may (endogenously) exhibit diversity, with some investors in each location following high-leverage, high-participation, and high-cost strategies and some unleveraged, low-participation, and low-cost strategies. The capital allocated to high-leverage strategies may be vulnerable even to small changes in market-access costs, which can lead to discontinuous price drops, de-leveraging, and portfolio-flow reversals. Moreover, the market is subject to contagion, in that an adverse shock to investors at a subset of locations affects prices everywhere.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicolae Gârleanu & Stavros Panageas & Jianfeng Yu, 2013. "Financial Entanglement: A Theory of Incomplete Integration, Leverage, Crashes, and Contagion," NBER Working Papers 19381, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19381
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Briana Chang & Shengxing Zhang, 2015. "Endogenous Market Making and Network Formation," Discussion Papers 1534, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).
    2. Chang, Briana & Zhang, Shengxing, 2015. "Endogenous market making and network formation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 65105, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Hugonnier, Julien & Prieto, Rodolfo, 2015. "Asset pricing with arbitrage activity," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 411-428.
    4. Chang, Briana & Zhang, Shengxing, 2015. "Endogenous market making and network formation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86275, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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