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International Coordination of Macroprudential Policies with Capital Flows and Financial Asymmetries

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Abstract

We consider a two-country macro model in which countries have limited ability to issue state-contingent contracts in international markets. Both countries have incentives to stabilize their economy by using macroprudential policy (limiting leverage or capital inflows), but the emerging economy depends on the advanced economy to bear global risk. Lack of coordination hurts developing economies but benefits advanced economies. Financially developed economies are unwilling to intermediate global risk, which means bearing systemic risk, preferring financial stability over credit flows. Advanced economies prefer tighter macroprudential policies than would occur with coordination, giving them greater bargaining power when negotiating international agreements.

Suggested Citation

  • William Chen & Gregory Phelan, 2017. "International Coordination of Macroprudential Policies with Capital Flows and Financial Asymmetries," Department of Economics Working Papers 2017-05, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Nov 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2017-05
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    File URL: https://web.williams.edu/Economics/wp/ChenPhelanMacroprudentialPolicy_Nov2018.pdf
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    1. Jonathan Heathcote & Fabrizio Perri, 2013. "The International Diversification Puzzle Is Not as Bad as You Think," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 121(6), pages 1108-1159.
    2. Arnaud Costinot & Guido Lorenzoni & Iván Werning, 2014. "A Theory of Capital Controls as Dynamic Terms-of-Trade Manipulation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 122(1), pages 77-128.
    3. Jose M Berrospide & Ricardo Correa & Linda S Goldberg & Friederike Niepmann, 2017. "International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from the United States," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 435-476, March.
    4. Claessens, Stijn & Ghosh, Swati R. & Mihet, Roxana, 2013. "Macro-prudential policies to mitigate financial system vulnerabilities," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 153-185.
    5. Bruno, Valentina & Shim, Ilhyock & Shin, Hyun Song, 2017. "Comparative assessment of macroprudential policies," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 183-202.
    6. Gregory Phelan, 2016. "Financial Intermediation, Leverage, and Macroeconomic Instability," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 199-224, October.
    7. Reinhardt, Dennis & Sowerbutts, Rhiannon, 2015. "Regulatory arbitrage in action: evidence from banking flows and macroprudential policy," Bank of England working papers 546, Bank of England.
    8. Ana Fostel & John Geanakoplos & Gregory Phelan, 2015. "Global Collateral: How Financial Innovation Drives Capital Flows and Increases Financial Instability," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015-12, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Feb 2017.
    9. Banerjee, Ryan & Devereux, Michael B. & Lombardo, Giovanni, 2016. "Self-oriented monetary policy, global financial markets and excess volatility of international capital flows," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 275-297.
    10. Emmanuel Farhi & Iván Werning, 2014. "Dilemma Not Trilemma? Capital Controls and Exchange Rates with Volatile Capital Flows," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 62(4), pages 569-605, November.
    11. George-Marios Angeletos & Vasia Panousi, 2011. "Financial Integration, Entrepreneurial Risk and Global Imbalances," NBER Working Papers 16761, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Phelan, Gregory & Toda, Alexis Akira, 2019. "Securitized markets, international capital flows, and global welfare," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(3), pages 571-592.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International Capital Flows; Capital Controls; Macroeconomic Instability; Macroprudential Regulation; Policy Coordination; Spillovers; Financial Crises;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F38 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Financial Policy: Financial Transactions Tax; Capital Controls
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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