IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/vig/wpaper/1801.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Energy Tax Reform and Poverty Alleviation in Mexico

Author

Listed:
  • José M. Labeaga
  • Xavier Labandeira
  • Xiral López-Otero

Abstract

Equity and efficiency are crucial issues behind any tax reform, but they are particularly relevant in countries with high inequality and large shares of poverty. This paper provides a comprehensive socio-economic empirical assessment of Mexico’s recently implemented tax reforms in the energy domain, and of a hypothetical (partial) removal of existing electricity subsidies. Using the rich National Household Income and Expenditure Survey within the context of a demand system adjustment of non-durable goods, this article provides the publicrevenue, environmental and distributional impacts from the simulation of different combinations of energy taxation, subsidyremoval and distributive offsets.

Suggested Citation

  • José M. Labeaga & Xavier Labandeira & Xiral López-Otero, 2018. "Energy Tax Reform and Poverty Alleviation in Mexico," Working Papers 1801, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
  • Handle: RePEc:vig:wpaper:1801
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://webx06.webs4.uvigo.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/wp1801.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2018
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Deaton, Angus, 1990. "Price elasticities from survey data : Extensions and Indonesian results," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 281-309, June.
    2. Sun, Chuanwang & Ouyang, Xiaoling, 2016. "Price and expenditure elasticities of residential energy demand during urbanization: An empirical analysis based on the household-level survey data in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 56-63.
    3. Romero-Jordán, Desiderio & del Río, Pablo & Jorge-García, Marta & Burguillo, Mercedes, 2010. "Price and income elasticities of demand for passenger transport fuels in Spain. Implications for public policies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 3898-3909, August.
    4. Eskeland, Gunnar S. & Feyzioglu, Tarhan N., 1997. "Is demand for polluting goods manageable? An econometric study of car ownership and use in Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 423-445, August.
    5. Simona Bigerna and Carlo Andrea Bollino, 2014. "Electricity Demand in Wholesale Italian Market," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3).
    6. Wales, T. J. & Woodland, A. D., 1983. "Estimation of consumer demand systems with binding non-negativity constraints," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 263-285, April.
    7. Olivier Durand-Lasserve & Lorenza Campagnolo & Jean Chateau & Rob Dellink, 2015. "Modelling of Distributional Impacts of Energy Subsidy Reforms: an Illustration with Indonesia," Working Papers 2015.68, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    8. Attanasio, Orazio & Di Maro, Vincenzo & Lechene, Valérie & Phillips, David, 2013. "Welfare consequences of food prices increases: Evidence from rural Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 136-151.
    9. Steven T. Yen & Biing-Hwan Lin & David M. Smallwood, 2003. "Quasi- and Simulated-Likelihood Approaches to Censored Demand Systems: Food Consumption by Food Stamp Recipients in the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(2), pages 458-478.
    10. Eltony, M. N. & Al-Mutairi, N. H., 1995. "Demand for gasoline in Kuwait : An empirical analysis using cointegration techniques," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 249-253, July.
    11. Galindo, Luis Miguel, 2005. "Short- and long-run demand for energy in Mexico: a cointegration approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(9), pages 1179-1185, June.
    12. Susan Olivia & John Gibson, 2008. "Household Energy Demand and the Equity and Efficiency Aspects of Subsidy Reform in Indonesia," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 21-40.
    13. Peter Heindl, 2015. "Measuring Fuel Poverty: General Considerations and Application to German Household Data," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 71(2), pages 178-215, June.
    14. Lin, Boqiang & Jiang, Zhujun, 2011. "Estimates of energy subsidies in China and impact of energy subsidy reform," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 273-283, March.
    15. Sterner, Thomas, 1989. " Factor Demand and Substitution in a Developing Country: Energy Use in Mexican Manufacturing," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 91(4), pages 723-739.
    16. Sheinbaum, C. & Martínez, M. & Rodríguez, L., 1996. "Trends and prospects in Mexican residential energy use," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 493-504.
    17. Orlando Reyes. & Roberto Escalante. & Anna Matas., 2010. "La demanda de gasolinas en México: Efectos y alternativas ante el cambio climático," Economía: teoría y práctica, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, México, vol. 32(1), pages 83-111, Enero-Jun.
    18. Liu, Wei & Li, Hong, 2011. "Improving energy consumption structure: A comprehensive assessment of fossil energy subsidies reform in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4134-4143, July.
    19. Solaymani, Saeed & Kari, Fatimah, 2014. "Impacts of energy subsidy reform on the Malaysian economy and transportation sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 115-125.
    20. Iootty, Mariana & Pinto Jr., Helder & Ebeling, Francisco, 2009. "Automotive fuel consumption in Brazil: Applying static and dynamic systems of demand equations," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5326-5333, December.
    21. William A Pizer & Steven Sexton, 2019. "The Distributional Impacts of Energy Taxes," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 13(1), pages 104-123.
    22. Lee, Lung-Fei & Pitt, Mark M, 1986. "Microeconometric Demand Systems with Binding Nonnegativity Constraints: The Dual Approach," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(5), pages 1237-1242, September.
    23. Ngui, Dianah & Mutua, John & Osiolo, Hellen & Aligula, Eric, 2011. "Household energy demand in Kenya: An application of the linear approximate almost ideal demand system (LA-AIDS)," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 7084-7094.
    24. Crôtte, Amado & Noland, Robert B. & Graham, Daniel J., 2010. "An analysis of gasoline demand elasticities at the national and local levels in Mexico," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 4445-4456, August.
    25. Gundimeda, Haripriya & Kohlin, Gunnar, 2008. "Fuel demand elasticities for energy and environmental policies: Indian sample survey evidence," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 517-546, March.
    26. Amemiya, Takeshi, 1984. "Tobit models: A survey," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1-2), pages 3-61.
    27. Chihwa Kao & Lung-fei Lee & Mark M. Pitt, 2001. "Simulated Maximum Likelihood Estimation of the Linear Expenditure System with Binding Non-Negativity Constraints," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 2(1), pages 215-235, May.
    28. Dongfeng Chang & Apostolos Serletis, 2014. "The Demand For Gasoline: Evidence From Household Survey Data," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(2), pages 291-313, March.
    29. Dennis, Allen, 2016. "Household welfare implications of fossil fuel subsidy reforms in developing countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 597-606.
    30. Berndt, Ernst R. & Botero, German, 1985. "Energy demand in the transportation sector of Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 219-238, April.
    31. Kristin Komives & Todd M. Johnson & Jonathan D. Halpern & Jose Luis Aburto & John R. Scott, 2009. "Residential Electricity Subsidies in Mexico : Exploring Options for Reform and for Enhancing the Impact on the Poor," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 5959.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Distribution; equity; emissions; subsidy;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:vig:wpaper:1801. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Departamento de Economía Aplicada). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deviges.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.