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US-China Rivalry: The Macro Policy Choices

Author

Listed:
  • Rod Tyers

    (Business School, University of Western Australia and Research School of Economics, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis (CAMA), Australian National University)

  • Yixiao Zhou

    (School of Economics and Finance, Curtin Business School, Curtin University)

Abstract

Stylized representations of recent US and Chinese tax reforms, tariffs against imports and alternative Chinese monetary targeting are examined using a calibrated global macro model that embodies both trade and financial interdependencies. For both countries, unilateral capital tax relief and bilateral tariffs are shown to be “beggar thy neighbor” in consequence with tariffs most advantageous for the US if revenue finances consumption tax relief. China is nonetheless a net loser when these policies are implemented unilaterally by the US, irrespective of its policy response, though a currency float is shown to cushion the effects on its GDP in the short run. Equilibria in normal form non-cooperative tariff games exhibit spill-overs that are substantial but insufficient to deter dominant strategies. The US imposes tariffs while China liberalizes, sustaining fiscal balance via consumption tax relief in the US and expenditure restraint in China.

Suggested Citation

  • Rod Tyers & Yixiao Zhou, 2019. "US-China Rivalry: The Macro Policy Choices," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 19-08, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:19-08
    Note: MD5 = eae073bb5d31e5f9a40866905e5b2737
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trade policy; macroeconomic policy; general equilibrium analysis; numerical theory; China;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • F47 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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